Yassmin Abdel-Magied says she feels 'a little bit betrayed by Australia' in an interview with Buzzfeed UK. Picture: Buzzfeed UK/Facebook Source:Facebook
Yassmin Abdel-Magied says she feels 'a little bit betrayed by Australia' in an interview with Buzzfeed UK. Picture: Buzzfeed UK/Facebook Source:Facebook

Yassmin Abdel-Magied: ‘I feel a bit betrayed by Australia’

YASSMIN Abdel-Magied says she feels betrayed by Australia and didn't feel safe in her home country before she fled to London.

The controversial ABC identity and self-declared "most hated Muslim" in Australia made the comments in an interview with Buzzfeed UK.

In a video interview, the Muslim activist and former Australia Wide presenter said she believed she had "toed the line" for 10 years in Australian public life before lashing out in the now-infamous Q&A clash with Tasmanian Senator Jacquie
Lambie that catapulted her into the spotlight.

In the February segment, Ms Abdel-Magied called Islam was "the most feminist religion" in what descended into a live TV screaming match between the two women.

"For some reason I just decided at that point that if I didn't say anything, well, then, who would, right?" she said of her decision to go toe-to-toe with Lambie.

"If me as a young, brown, Muslim woman, sitting next to the politician wasn't going to say to the politician, 'hey, check yourself', who was gong to do it on my behalf?"

The 26-year-old engineer turned TV presenter recently described herself as "the most publicly hated Muslim in Australia", reflecting on the backlash against an insensitive Facebook post she published and deleted on Anzac Day this year, as well as the reaction to her Q&A appearance.

Before leaving for London earlier this month, Ms Abdel-Magied revealed she had struggled with the backlash.

Controversy has followed Ms Abdel-Magied to the UK. She again made headlines when a TV network published a poll asking people to vote on whether she should have left the country or should "stay and face her critics".

Ms Abdel-Magied told Buzzfeed she thought her freedom of speech was stifled in Australia.

"Freedom of speech doesn't really apply to the truth," she said. "To me, that was my truth, but I wasn't really allowed to see it and people were very upset so it's taught me a lot."

News Corp Australia


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