A Coastal Taipan ready to strike, the same breed as the snake that bit little Agnes Water boy Eli Campbell. Source: Discovery channel.
A Coastal Taipan ready to strike, the same breed as the snake that bit little Agnes Water boy Eli Campbell. Source: Discovery channel.

WATCH: Why the Coastal Taipan is such a deadly snake

UNLIKE many snakes, the Coastal Taipan is not one to back away from a close or surprise encounter.

What is even more terrifying is that it can quickly hurl itself forwards or sideways and reach high off the ground.

It's a danger that Rockhampton snake catcher Wayne Cameron, who was killed by a Taipan bite on Sunday night, well knew.

Mr Cameron's wife Jenny urged people who aren't familiar with the reptiles to stay away from them.

"If you don't know what you're doing, leave them alone," she told to the Morning Bulletin today.

Wayne Cameron working for his own business, Reptrix Reptile
Wayne Cameron working for his own business, Reptrix Reptile

Mr Cameron was on a job catching a Coastal Taipan, when he was bitten.

A terrifying video from the Discovery Channel shows the extreme danger of the snakes.

 

Coastal Taipan 'extremely nervous and alert snakes'

"The Coastal Taipan is often regarded as the most dangerous snake in Australia,'' Museum Australia's website says.

"They are extremely nervous and alert snakes, and any movement near them is likely to trigger an attack.

"Like any snake the Taipan prefers to avoid conflict and will quietly slip away if given the chance, however if surprised or cornered it will ferociously defend itself.

"When threatened, the Coastal Taipan adopts a loose striking stance with its head and forebody raised.

" It inflates and compresses its body laterally (not dorso-ventrally like many other species) and may also spread the back of its jaws to give the head a broader, lance-shaped appearance.

" Invariably the snake will strike, often without any warning, inflicting multiple snapping bites with extreme accuracy and efficiency.

"The muscular lightweight body of the Taipan allows it to hurl itself forwards or sideways and reach high off the ground, and such is the speed of the attack that a person may be bitten several times before realising the snake is there."

 

 

The fangs of a coastal taipan are 12mm long and it injects large amounts of highly toxic venom deep into the flesh.

The venom affects the nervous system and the blood's ability to clot, and victims may experience headache, nausea/vomiting, collapse, convulsions (especially in children), paralysis, internal bleeding, destruction of muscle tissue and kidney damage.

The onset of serious symptoms is often rapid, so anyone suspected of receiving a bite must seek medical attention immediately, no matter how trivial the bite may appear.



With room to run free just Youwaitandsee

With room to run free just Youwaitandsee

Veteran Coffs Harbour trainer is hoping history can repeat tomorrow.

#Press for Progress on International Women's Day

#Press for Progress on International Women's Day

Call for Coffs Coast to embrace International Women's Day

Is a dolphin sea pen in the harbour the best option?

Is a dolphin sea pen in the harbour the best option?

Study to assess whether DMM dolphins can be rehoused in harbour

Local Partners