Brisbane hairdressers have been inundated with customers wearing hats, after making a fateful mistake with their hair during the long pandemic lockdown.
Brisbane hairdressers have been inundated with customers wearing hats, after making a fateful mistake with their hair during the long pandemic lockdown.

What lockdown is doing to our locks

BAD HAIR DAY

IT SEEMS the last legacy of the coronavirus pandemic won't only be economic recession and a health obsession with washing our hands, but bad haircuts.

Price Attack chief executive John Pascoe says that as salons operated by the Brisbane-based company have reopened, there has been a rush of clients who have used supermarket hair dye while in lockdown, some with disastrous results.

"Almost all our salons have reported customers wearing hats in to hide their mistakes," says Pascoe. One Queensland salon reported three customers arriving with varying greenish-shades of hair.

Pascoe say a number of businessmen also have turned up in a panic with instructions to lose the 'lockdown look'. "One fellow tried to trim his sideburns, and should have put down the scissors sooner than later as they were almost in line with his eyebrows when he finished," he says.

Price Attack CEO John Pascoe.
Price Attack CEO John Pascoe.

 

Brisbane barber Jimmy O'Brien, who runs the Jimmy Rod's chain, tells City Beat that his staff have been run off their feet as hirsute men emerge from isolation wanting their hair cut and their beards trimmed.

"We have guys coming in looking like woolly mammoths after eight weeks," says O'Brien. "Beard cuts are particularly popular because we stopped doing that for a while because of social distancing concerns."

O'Brien says that while business is looking up, there are still restrictions on the number of customers allowed in shops. "For a 50 square metre shop there are only eight people - four barbers and four customers," he says.

GLASS AND A HALF

BRISBANE-BASED silica miner Diatreme Resources does not see demand from China's solar panel glass market abating anytime soon.

Diatreme boss Neil McIntyre says the company now has off-take agreements with two large Chinese solar panel manufacturers for a million tonnes of silica from the company's planned Galalar project in north Queensland.

McIntyre says regulatory approvals for the mine are proceeding with plans to get the project up and running by 2022. He says the project could contribute to the post-pandemic recovery of the nearby Hope Vale/Cooktown and generate up to 110 full-time jobs.

A worker installs solar panels.
A worker installs solar panels.

 

The silica sand market is expected to expand at a compound annual growth rate of 7.2 per cent through to 2022, reaching revenues of US$9.6 billion.

Meanwhile, the global solar PV glass market is seen growing to US$48.2 billion by 2025, up from US$3.3 billion in 2016, amid strong demand from the Asia-Pacific region. Brisbane-based rich-lister and resource investor Brian Flannery is now the company's biggest shareholder.

GREENWOOD SHOOTS 

It's not all gloom and doom on the construction front for a number of Queensland's councils.

Out Ipswich way, the city council is hard at it breathing life into its central business district, with a new administration building, library and civic plaza.

Word has it that the council has tipped in $250 million to fund the new digs and associated buildings. Hutchinson Builders are on the job and should have it all done and dusted by the end of 2021.

Not to be outdone, next door in Logan City, the council has just kicked off construction of the first major office development in Beenleigh for a decade.

On the tools ... Steve Greenwood
On the tools ... Steve Greenwood

 

While not in the league of Ipswich Council's project, the seven-story, $26 million dollar building will provide much needed jobs during construction and provide for a 140 new full time jobs when complete, also in late 2021.

 

 

And the common driver for both projects? Former Property Council chief Steve Greenwood, who chaired the Ipswich CBD project over the last 18 months after the council was sacked, and currently chairs Invest Logan.

BATTLE LINES 

THE lawyers are sniffing the big money in defence project these days.

Brisbane-based law shop McCullough Robertson has launched a full-service advisory arm supporting the defence industry, and more specifically the Commonwealth Department of Defence.

McR Defence is reportedly an industry first for the legal sector, combining legal advice with risk and commercial advisory, as well as program and project management.

Integral to this new business are three recent personnel moves from infrastructure and construction giant Downer Group to McCullough Robertson - Brett Sangster, who will be partner and lead for McR Defence, Evan Economo, a partner and construction specialist, and Rebecca Sinclair, who will be managing director.

Originally published as What lockdown is doing to our locks



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