A young wedge-tailed Eagle is returning to health after being rescued by WIRES.
A young wedge-tailed Eagle is returning to health after being rescued by WIRES.

Wired to help native fauna

RESCUING injured wildlife is a noble task but you don’t need a cape and super powers; just the right mix of compassion and training.

Raptor co-ordinator Llyris Wood’s empathy for feathered friends inspired her to become a WIRES volunteer. She recently rescued a young wedge-tailed eagle on the way to Bowraville.

“It had no apparent injuries but was bewildered, thin and missing quite a few flight feathers,” Ms Wood said.

“The Eagle has since spent time in a WIRES facility in Coffs hinterland, is eating really well and its flight feathers are growing steadily.

“Soon it will be ready to be released back into its territory, having been given a vital second chance due to the wonderful co-operation of the public and WIRES carers,” she said.

If handling feathery, furry or scaly creatures is not your calling but you want to be involved, there’s a range of duties to suit each individual.

Training co-ordinator Lara Townsend said people are assessed for suitability and preference.

“Some people don’t want to handle animals but prefer to take phone calls or adopt an administrative role,” Ms Townsend said.

“We take into account personal interests and where people want to go,” she said.

The WIRES training course will be held on March 26 and 27 and provides, knowledge, contacts and support.



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