Tuesday's hail storm captured on camera

PAUL and Roslyn Owens' Coramba property went into whiteout on Tuesday.

Paul said he had never seen anything like Tuesday's hail storm in more than 18 years at Coramba.

“I think our area was the worst hit in terms of volume,” he said.

“Our one acre was so full of hailstones you couldn't get a needle between them.

“We have divots all over the lawn as though a golfer had been hitting the green and you can see indentations all along the roofline of the Colorbond roof.

“We lost part of our TV aerial, the septic tank cover was smashed. We got hit with lightning as well and lost our fax machine.”

Nana Glen farmer Barry Hallgath said it was the largest sized hail he could ever remember, looking back 60 years, with stones considerably bigger than golf balls, although not as large as tennis balls.

He said hail stones buried themselves in garden beds, smashed 'like incendiary missiles' on the bitumen and caused metre-high splashes as they fell into the dam.

Barry Hallgath said he believed the hail came from very high in the atmosphere and descended vertically as there was no wind to drive it horizontally, meaning it was not as destructive as some wind-driven hailstorms he had experienced on the farm, which had stripped crops and broken windows.

But he said one of his neighbours had lost 86 tiles on his roof on Tuesday and they had experienced a five-hour blackout when the hail brought down a power line.

Upper Orara resident Sam Brown said hail had smashed the windscreen of his car, parked outside the family home and had also damaged sheeting on the back veranda.

Upper Orara resident Barry Dengate said the huge hailstones 'sounded like bricks' as they hit his Colorbond roof.

A hailstone broke one of his skylights and punched holes in the translucent corrugated sheeting over his courtyard.

Upper Orara resident Rob Rogl, who had installed solar tubes on his roof three days earlier, feared the worst as he watched hailstones bouncing on the paddocks and heard cows screaming as the hailstones hit. He said the tubes were rated to withstand 2.5cm hail, but the hailstones were up to 5cm in diameter.

The solar tubes, mounted at a 45-degree angle on the roof, survived intact, but his roof tiles were cracked and several smashed, creating a hole in his roof.



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