Entertainment

Truckin's in the blood

Jon Kelly, owner of Heavy Haulage Australia, stars in the TV series Mega Truckers.
Jon Kelly, owner of Heavy Haulage Australia, stars in the TV series Mega Truckers. Paul Broben - Foxtel

IF IT'S big, then Jon Kelly can move it.

As the founder and owner of Heavy Haulage Australia, it's Kelly's job to figure out how to move everything from 70-tonne locomotives and 20-metre-high catamarans to the world's largest bulldozer along the east coast of Australia.

He started the South Brisbane-based business when he was just 19 and now, at just 32, is running a $50m business.

MegaTruckers - A&E - Monday at 6.30pm Qld, 7.30pm NSW.

"Trucks run in both sides of my family, so the only way out was blood transfusion," he told The Guide.

"I've really enjoyed trucks ever since I was a toddler.

"It was a foregone conclusion by the time was 10, but it was daunting to turn a childhood dream into a very successful business.

"I was 19 when I bought my first truck and by the time I was 20 had $1m in debt."

Kelly is known in the heavy haulage industry for the amount of time and money he spends on fitting out his trucks. He spends millions on painting and extra chrome and employs two full-time detailers.

"It's just like having a Saturday sports car, but instead I have 50 trucks," he said.

"Everyone enjoys driving down the street in a good looking sports car and it's the same persona with trucks."

Kelly set up a YouTube site for the company where he showed off his tricked-out trucks and as the site neared 10 million hits he was approached by A&E.

The pay-TV channel filmed a one-off Mega Truckers special, which was so successful that it has been expanded into a full series.

Cameras follow the day-to-day operations of the business, which are anything but boring.

It's a behind-the-scenes look at the planning and precision needed to load and transport large, heavy and sometimes oddly-shaped cargo.

"When we're doing big, heavy-haul moves the issues we have to deal with are mostly infrastructure restrictions like road widths, height restrictions and low power lines."

Kelly can spend more than a year planning a big job.

"I enjoy helping the boys and doing the work," he said.

"Nothing is better than doing a job that people say can't be done and doing it incident free. Actually, nothing is better than sending the bill (laughs)."

He hopes the series gives viewers and everyday drivers an insight into the skill involved in truck driving.

"We take our job very seriously," he said.

"We're trying to raise the public profile of transport in general.

"Although I am a cranky boss I am a very fair person and I'm here to make sure my customer's cargo gets there issue free and they ring us for the next job.

"I'm just a normal guy who didn't have any extra privileges.

"I run my business on a simple ethos: I buy the best equipment, pay the best money and attract the best staff."

Topics:  trucking tv series



Simply move in and enjoy

MOVE IN: All the hard work has been done in this North Sapphire home.

Check out this week's Real Estate Property Guide cover home

What your coffee says about you

What coffee you drink says a lot about your personlity, the experts say.

WELL this is an awkwardly accurate account...

Buskers is back with a bang

The Coffs Harbour International Buskers and Comedy Festival return for a week of fun events.

25 acts from all over the world

Local Partners

Quins mum: 'Hey Miranda Kerr, want to wife-swap with me?'

"WE'RE supposed to make an effort to look perfect for our husbands? I've got eight kids lady, getting out of bed is an effort."

Why '90s Hollywood heart-throb disappeared

Wild America co-stars Jonathan Taylor Thomas, 15, Devon Sawa, 18, and Scott Bairstow, 27, pose in New York June 26, 1997.

IN THE late 90s, Casper star Devon Sawa was a teen heart throb.

Wengie now a Powerpuff Girl

Australian YouTube star Wengie  voices the new PowerPuff Girl Bliss.

Aussie makes debut as the fourth Powerpuff Girl

Wild HIMYM theory is blowing our minds

A new How I Met Your Mother fan theory would change a major plot point.

If this new theory is true, it’s opened up a whole new can of worms.

AFL player labels The Project racist after interview

Ex-Collingwood AFL player Heritier Lumumba held back tears on The Project describing the tag he carried around at the club. Picture: The Project/Channel 10

Heritier Lumumba went on the show to talk about racism

Only movie trailer you need to see this week

What kind of animal would banish these puppers?

IT’S been almost four years since the last Wes Anderson film.

Biggest Bachelorette mystery solved

Jourdan suffered an injury on the first episode of The Bachelorette.

ONE moment this week left viewers absolutely stumped.