Two trucks in the space of a few hours broke down after losing traction on the wet road surface.
Two trucks in the space of a few hours broke down after losing traction on the wet road surface.

Truck break downs beyond a joke

It's yet another reminder that Coffs Harbour has waited too long for a bypass.

In previous years B-doubles have sometimes broken down after losing traction in the wet, on the steep bends either side of town.

But in recent days the situation has gone from bad to worse, with several break downs impacting traffic and putting motorists at risk.

In the space of a few hours on Sunday afternoon (February 21) three separate B-doubles lost traction near The Big Windmill south of the CBD.

In recent days with the prolonged wet the situation has gone from bad to worse with several truck break downs impacting traffic and putting motorists at risk.
In recent days with the prolonged wet the situation has gone from bad to worse with several truck break downs impacting traffic and putting motorists at risk.

Similar break downs have occurred in the past week.

One incident at around 2pm on Sunday closed both northbound lanes of the highway. As of 4pm one lane was still closed with banked up traffic crawling through the remaining lane.

As of 5pm traffic had returned to normal. 

ENOUGH TO MAKE YOU CRY: A B-double dropped its load of onions on the Pacific Hwy in the centre of Coffs Harbour in 2016.
ENOUGH TO MAKE YOU CRY: A B-double dropped its load of onions on the Pacific Hwy in the centre of Coffs Harbour in 2016.

For years B-doubles have created havoc through town dropping their loads (pig carcasses in 2002 and a load of onions in 2016) or tipping over at the Englands Road roundabout.

B Double rig crashed at the England's Road Pacific Highway roundabout, south of Coffs in 2016.
B Double rig crashed at the England's Road Pacific Highway roundabout, south of Coffs in 2016.

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In 2002 a truck full of pig carcasses rolled on the Pacific Highway in the Coffs Harbour CBD.
In 2002 a truck full of pig carcasses rolled on the Pacific Highway in the Coffs Harbour CBD.

The community has been waiting decades for the Coffs Harbour Bypass. A ceremonial sod turning was held late last year.

Last month the first house to be demolished to make way for the bypass came down. A new RFS facility will be built on the site.

All directly impacted property owners along the route have been contacted by Transport for NSW, which currently owns or is in an agreement regarding 121 properties.

The 14 kilometre Coffs Harbour bypass will be the city's biggest ever infrastructure project and will provide 2000 jobs locally during its construction while supporting up to 12,000 jobs over the whole life-cycle of the project.



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