USQ post-graduate student Sherrilyn Walters is researching how the force generation and techniques used by martial artists can be applied to help other athletes and people improve their general well-being.
USQ post-graduate student Sherrilyn Walters is researching how the force generation and techniques used by martial artists can be applied to help other athletes and people improve their general well-being.

Traditional practice improves modern life

MARTIAL ARTS : Having submitted the last review of her Masters thesis, Sherrilyn Walters is excited about what the future holds.

The USQ postgraduate student, who is completing her Master of Science Research in Sports and Exercise Science, is focused on how traditional martial arts skills can be applied in other sports and everyday life.

“Traditional martial arts is a very in depth study,” Walters said.

“There’s so much to it that can be applied in other sports and exercise and I can’t thank USQ enough for their support during the whole experience.”

Walters’ studies are focused on how martial artists generate force and how that can be used to improve health, wellbeing and performance.

“Martial artists use inter-abdominal pressure to stabilise themselves and generate,” she said.

“It (martial arts) helps you focus on the way that you move, the way that you stand which can help correct things like lower back pain and imbalances in the body.

“And one of the great things about traditional martial arts is it’s a very sustainable sport.

“In a lot of sport you break down as you age.

“In martial arts you’re focused on doing things right and it actually helps you improve your longevity and you can keep training.”

Walters knows first hand just how beneficial martial arts can be having studied several herself.

“I originally come from South Africa,” she said.

“I travelled around the world a little bit and when I went back to South Africa, that’s when I started martial arts.

“It was partially the self-defence aspect but also I really liked the movement.

“I started with Tai Chi and moved into Kung-fu.

“I found that it was a real fulfilling sport.

“It can be quite challenging but at the same time it shows you how much there is to learn about your body.”

Sherrilyn and her husband Lester run the Chinese Martial Arts and Health Centre Australia near Withcott and offer a variety of classes, including women’s only self-defence.



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