Keeping powerlines clear from trees and debris could help avoid the majority of storm-related outages.
Keeping powerlines clear from trees and debris could help avoid the majority of storm-related outages. Tracey Joynson

Helping powerlines and traditonal storm season co-exist

THERE'S a storm coming and Essential Energy wants everyone on the Coffs Coast to stay safe in case powerlines come down near them.

The region's traditional storm season is underway, prompting the energy provider's North Coast regional manager Brendon Neyland to provide tips on how best prevent and manage incidents.

He is advising residents to remove debris from around their homes, clear gutters and check the clearance between trees and powerlines.

"The majority of storm-related outages are caused by tree branches and debris being blown into overhead powerlines," Brendon said.

"In these situations, residents are reminded to keep at least eight metres clear of fallen powerlines or any objects in contact with them and always assume the wires are live.

"Be mindful when walking or driving after a storm that fallen tree branches may also hide damaged powerlines or other electrical equipment."

Essential Energy recommend all householders have a torch with ample batteries, candles and waterproof matches, a battery operated radio, non-perishable food and can opener, drinking water, spare clothes, a first aid kit and essential medication and a list of emergency phone numbers.

"We encourage residents to report any fallen powerlines, network damage, fires or trees contacting powerlines to Essential Energy on 13 20 80 or call Triple-0 if the situation is life-threatening," Brendon said.

For more information on electrical safety during storms, visit essentialenergy.com.au/safety or call Essential Energy on 13 23 91.



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