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The reality of Christmas

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WITH all of life's distractions, we sometimes forget the true meaning of Christmas.

When we are caught up buying presents and over indulging in food, Christmas can be a time when we often forget what really matters.

But bad experiences and misfortunes can culminate at Christmas time, which means for vulnerable and marginalised Australians, Christmas can be the hardest time of the year.

For the Salvos it's our busiest period, with more than 300,000 families and individuals seeking assistance. We give out more than 500,000 gifts and toys, and serve over 10,000 meals to those who don't have the means to celebrate Christmas.

We can only meet this need because year after year Australians come together and stand by those doing it tough. This, I believe, is the true meaning of Christmas.

So this holiday season let's remember those going it alone. By donating $29 to The Salvation Army's Christmas Appeal, you can help put a present under the tree and food on the table, bringing hope where it's needed most.

- Neil Venables, The Salvation Army

council roadside bulky goods pickup at Graham drive Sandy Beach.

11  FEBRUARY 2015
Photo Trevor Veale / Coffs Coast Advocate
council roadside bulky goods pickup at Graham drive Sandy Beach. 11 FEBRUARY 2015 Photo Trevor Veale / Coffs Coast Advocate Trevor Veale

Bulky goods solution

I AGREE the kerside rubbish is an eyesore.

Mostly because people put it out far too early, plus the pick-up usually is around school holiday seasons so not a good look for visitors to our beautiful area.

Solution: Have council open the gates of the dump area two times a year, free of charge so people can get rid of it there and therefore not have a mess on the sidewalks.

It might cost the council to hire extra people for those two days but hey we pay rates.

Just a thought

Leanne Walmsley

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, left, takes a selfie photo with Australian soccer team captain Mile Jedinak during a reception following their qualification to the 2018 soccer World Cup in Sydney, Australia, Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017. Australia's 3-1 victory over Honduras secured the next-to-last spot in the World Cup in Russia. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)
Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, left, takes a selfie photo with Australian soccer team captain Mile Jedinak during a reception following their qualification to the 2018 soccer World Cup in Sydney, Australia, Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017. Australia's 3-1 victory over Honduras secured the next-to-last spot in the World Cup in Russia. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft) Rick Rycroft

Time for political reforms

WHEN I rise in the morning I put ABC 24 on to get my daily dose of what passes for unbiased news.

This week we had the Deputy Premier of NSW saying the esteemed Malcolm Turnbull should resign. 

Seems to me that everyone should resign what with nationality boo boos, Clive Palmer with a warrant out for his arrest and other tawdry misdemeanours by both houses.

How good would it be if we started over and had one vote per person that could not be spilled down to someone we would never have voted for in the first place.

Get rid of the Upper House, just more mouths at the troughs, have politicians made accountable and given 100 points when they start their term and if they do not do what they promised they get demerit points until they are at zero and then they go home with no ongoing perks and huge super amounts.

The Nationals and the Liberals cannot govern on their own, they must have a coalition to govern, get rid of one party and see how that pans out. 

If important issues need to be voted on, wait for the next election and save money by putting the referendum with the election I am tired of the posturing by our politicians when we really are small players in the big world. New Zealand seems to get it right far more than we do.

And yes, I would be happy to be in a position of power in the government and if I was,  there would be capable women all around me.

Sue Collingridge

Where the grass stands tall

AFTER calling through complaints in the past months for mowing attention in Urunga around old highway entrance from Coffs Harbour, I've now noticed other residents feel the same way I do as they've taken it upon themselves now to erect signage to street poles. 

The homemade signage is even shadowed in the long grass.

The main entrance and centre islands into Urunga around the caravan park through to the river bridge is an absolute disgrace and ratepayers are questioning Bellingen Council that we the residents of Urunga are tired of being treated as the poor cousins of the shire. 

Outside of it being an eyesore it's a matter of safety to bikers, walkers and vehicular traffic.

Its one thing to see all the new gardens put in place of removed trees street side in Bellingen Main Street then to come into Urunga you'd think we've been left of any priority list of council.

If it's not addressed residents will take the next step to have it aired on local news.

We all pay rates and if council can't meet the basic essentials then it's time the local minister stepped in and held Bellingen council accountable as enough is enough, council shouldn't be waiting for repeat complaints and shaming council signage erected roadside before they act.

Council don't blame the weather, it takes time to get to this length.

Brett Skinner

Is there an issue in your neighbourhood or community that you feel passionate about and want to see addressed? Have your say today.



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