Pipe Clay Lake at Corindi is still considered culturally important by the Gumbaynggirr people.
Pipe Clay Lake at Corindi is still considered culturally important by the Gumbaynggirr people.

Sustainabilty of Pipe Clay Lake culturally important

MEMBERS of the local Aboriginal community are among the residents spearheading efforts to improve the health of Pipe Clay Lake at Corindi.

The site is considered quite important culturally as it's still a source of bush tucker for the Gumbaynggirr people.

An estuary management plan (EMP) was adopted by Council in 2011 that aims to boost the health of the waterway and its catchment by cutting down on the amount of rubbish and other waste entering the lake.

The lake has long been used by the Gumbaynggirr people as a food source and the EMP also focused on increasing the amount of time that food could be gathered safely, through reducing contamination.

A Stormwater Community Education Program on cutting the amount of rubbish and other waste entering Pipe Clay Lake is central to the EMP. Interpretive signage on stormwater drains, targeted bus stop signage and information packs for residents have all been put in place.

In addition, a "Get to know your Lake" information day for local residents was held on Saturday, April 27, and attracted around 40 participants.

They were introduced to the Estuary Management Plan by Council staff, while Garby Elders Aunty Deb Dootson and Uncle Milton Duroux provided some personal anecdotes on their connections to Pipe Clay Lake. The Lake is the site of the "old camp", to which the Gumbaynggirr people were relocated in the 1920s and where they remained until the late 1980s.

"The event also included a bush tucker walk, Aboriginal art and basket-weaving activities, plus two short films from the Take 3 organisation," said Malcolm Robertson, Council's Coastal and Environmental Engineer. "These films highlighted the impacts that people have on our estuaries, but also reinforced the message that we can make a difference through very simple actions, such as - every time you are out enjoying your local environment, take home three pieces of rubbish with you.

"The main 'take home' message for the Corindi residents was that 'all streets lead to Pipe Clay Lake' and what you do in your backyard can directly impact your Lake."

The Stormwater Community Education Program has been delivered to the community through funding from NSW Office of Environment and Heritage and Council's Environmental Levy.

Click here for further information on Take 3 and what all Coffs Harbour residents can do to help improve local waterways and the ocean.



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