A healthy Japanese diet refers to a balanced consumption of grains, vegetables, fruits, fish and meat.
A healthy Japanese diet refers to a balanced consumption of grains, vegetables, fruits, fish and meat. AAP

Is sushi the secret to a longer life?

WHAT'S your go-to lunch of choice? If you opt for sushi over a sandwich, you're on the right track to a longer, healthier life.

According to scientists, adhering to Japan's recommended food guide has been linked to a lower risk of early death from all causes, including cardiovascular disease.

So when we say sushi, we don't mean the tempura-packed rolls drenched in yum-yum sauce. A healthy Japanese diet refers to a balanced consumption of grains, vegetables, fruits, fish and meat.

Scientists from Japan's National Centre for Global Health and Medicine in Tokyo found adhering to the guide improves a person's longevity.

The team set out to establish the link between sticking to the guide and total and cause-specific mortality by reviewing data from food and lifestyle surveys of almost 80,000 people aged between 45 and 70.

Each participant was followed for 15 years and none presented a history of cancer, stroke, heart disease or chronic liver disease.

Both men and women who scored higher on their adherence to the food guide had a 15 per cent lower mortality rate.

The researchers concluded: "Our findings suggest that balanced consumption of energy, grains, vegetables, fruits, meat, fish, eggs, soy products, dairy products, confectionaries, and alcoholic beverages can contribute to longevity."



Jetty to be transformed: Plan to demolish Forestry buildings

Jetty to be transformed: Plan to demolish Forestry buildings

Owners seek approval to clear Forestry site for development

Quinn's cup speech quick off the mark

Quinn's cup speech quick off the mark

Coffs Harbour's ARC winning rally driver's speech brings house down.

With room to run free just Youwaitandsee

With room to run free just Youwaitandsee

Veteran Coffs Harbour trainer is hoping history can repeat tomorrow.

Local Partners