Sunday afternoons watching football at Bellingen Park wouldn’t be as cold if matches were played in the summer.
Sunday afternoons watching football at Bellingen Park wouldn’t be as cold if matches were played in the summer.

Sport seasons turnaround

WHAT a magnificent weekend of weather we just experienced on the Coffs Coast.

Considering it’s March we should all be jumping for joy that we saw so much sunshine.

The reason I say that is because I’ve been taking a look at Coffs Harbour’s weather patterns and they don’t paint a pretty picture for the third month of the year.

In fact the amount of rain we receive on average in March leads me to believe that we’ve got our sporting seasons around the wrong way.

Instead of the traditional way of thinking where it’s cricket in summer and football in winter, the weather patterns build a case for the exact opposite.

Park Beach Bowling Club Colts and Coffs Tigers have both qualified for this weekend’s major semi-final in the cricket and it is a berth well worth earning.

Not only does it offer both clubs a direct passage into the grand final if either manage to win this weekend but it can also offer an armchair ride to the big decider if the weather intervenes.

And there’s a big chance of that happening.

On average Coffs Harbour receives a fraction more than 240mm of rain in March with an average 16.6 days in this month having some amount of rain.

Already in the past fortnight Coffs has received 132mm of rain with 11 days already having rain.

The seven-day forecast suggests that the next week will make it difficult for curators to prepare a belter of a wicket.

March and cricket finals just don’t seem to mix in this town.

So what are the driest months of the year?

Oddly enough it’s July, August and September.

Why can’t cricket become a winter sport?

Now this thought might have the four football codes jumping up and down but maybe they should think about the advantages of playing football in the summer months or the wet season as we should probably more accurately refer to that time of year.

Playing games under lights in warmer weather would bring larger crowds as there would be no cooler weather to turn people off spending time watching the football.

No offence, but I’ve spent some cold afternoons at Coramba Reserve and Bellingen Park over the six years that I’ve been working at the Coffs Coast Advocate.

It might make recruiting players a little bit easier too.

Players could come in from all over New South Wales and Queensland as they would be able to play in our football competitions during summer and then head home and play football there in the winter.

It’s an out-there idea I admit but surely the way the weather behaves in this town means the switch in sporting seasons should be given some thought.



REVEALED: Coffs Harbour's Most Influential list

premium_icon REVEALED: Coffs Harbour's Most Influential list

The final instalment of our 12-part series.

Coffs Harbour's Most Influential - Part 11

premium_icon Coffs Harbour's Most Influential - Part 11

The Coffs Coast Advocate lists the people effecting change

Mayor named Coffs' Most Influential

Mayor named Coffs' Most Influential

Results are in, mayor Denise Knight is the city's most influential.

Local Partners