UNDERWATER DANCE: Bargara man Kevin Hill, aka Jimmy Scaboo, captured a Spanish dancer putting on a show at the Basin.
UNDERWATER DANCE: Bargara man Kevin Hill, aka Jimmy Scaboo, captured a Spanish dancer putting on a show at the Basin. Kevin Hill

Spanish dancing up an underwater storm at the Basin

IT'S not hard to see where this stunning red sea slug gets its name from.

Known as a Spanish dancer, it certainly has the moves. Moves that have caught the eye of almost 2500 viewers since Bargara man Kevin Hill, aka Jimmy Scaboo, captured it swimming elegantly at the Basin.

An avid photographer, Mr Hill said he was taking his morning walk along Kellys Beach to capture the sunrise when he crossed another early bird walker who suggested he pop along to the popular swimming hole.

"Paul Stirling, a local conservationist, found the Spanish dancer washed up on the high tide," he said.

"It was all shrivelled up but Paul recognised and knew what it was and returned it to the ocean.

"It would have died if he didn't have his eyes open."

Mr Hill said not long after being returned to the water, the 18cm sea slug was in its element, putting on a show as it performed its dance.

The Spanish dancer got its name from its "skirt" swaying gracefully in the ocean current - some observers saw it as resembling a flamenco dancer's dress.

Mr Hill said Kellys Beach provided a wonderful opportunity to snap some amazing images of wildlife.

"I managed to photograph some rare humpback dolphins before and by sharing it more people get the chance to see it," he said.



Coffs trainer Sally Taylor saddles up ‘frustrating mare’

Premium Content Coffs trainer Sally Taylor saddles up ‘frustrating mare’

COFFS trainers are riding their strongest ever calendar year.

Number of NSW drivers busted over dodgy airbags

Premium Content Number of NSW drivers busted over dodgy airbags

Takata recall: Number of NSW drivers busted over dodgy airbags

Bizarre destinations NSW Schoolies are turning to

Premium Content Bizarre destinations NSW Schoolies are turning to

Schoolies NSW 2020: Students to hit surprising new destinations