Uncle Harry Mumbulla at Coffs Harbour Education Campus’s ‘hand wall’ yesterday.
Uncle Harry Mumbulla at Coffs Harbour Education Campus’s ‘hand wall’ yesterday. Leigh Jensen

10 years since Sorry Day began

A DECADE ago Clark Webb was in Year 10 when National Sorry Day began in this region with handprints on a wall at Coffs Harbour Education Campus.

Although he has vague recollections of the prints going up all those years ago, the Gumbaynggir man says the significance of the day has never been lost.

“For me, it’s a day to take into account everything that has happened in our history and to move forward together,” Mr Webb said during yesterday’s Sorry Day event at CHEC.

Mr Webb said people are starting to understand that saying sorry isn’t just about the stolen generation but saying sorry to all Aboriginal people.

“There’s some definite change happening,” he said.

Prof. Judy Atkinson, director of Gnibi College of Indigenous Australian Peoples and board member of the Healing Foundation, gave a passionate presentation via videolink to all SCU campuses.

“Sorry Day is not just about saying ‘sorry’, it is also about acknowledging that a lot of work has yet to be done for healing to continue,” she said.



Coffs Harbour's Most Influential - Part 11

premium_icon Coffs Harbour's Most Influential - Part 11

The Coffs Coast Advocate lists the people effecting change

Mayor named Coffs' Most Influential

Mayor named Coffs' Most Influential

Results are in, mayor Denise Knight is the city's most influential.

FAMILY FAVOURITE

FAMILY FAVOURITE

Sawtell Cup sponsor has extra special interest in the race

Local Partners