Editorial - November 12: Solemn day honours sacrifice

REMEMBRANCE Day is the most solemn and moving of commemorations, free of the public holiday and party fervour dressed up as patriotism which is Anzac Day.

Few might be aware you can, in part, thank an Australian journalist for how the anniversary of the end of the war to end all wars is marked.

Edward Honey, a journo working on Fleet Street , was so angered by the way people had danced with joy and even rioted in the streets on the day of the Armistice that he wrote a letter to The Evening News under a non de plume suggesting a more appropriate option: "five silent minutes of national remembrance."

So it has been since 1919, after King George requested all subjects of the Empire suspend normal activities on the hour of the Armistice "which stayed the worldwide carnage of the four preceding years and marked the victory of Right and Freedom."

Nowadays, we acknowledge not only those who were lost in the Great War, but all who have given so much in the conflicts which have followed.

We also honour those who continue to endure the physical and mental scars of battle.

As the centenary of Gallipoli nears, solemn, lasting and respectful remembrance is the very least we should all give.

Graeme Singleton,
Editor



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