The Emerald Beach community has a strong tradition of protesting issues they're passionate about.
The Emerald Beach community has a strong tradition of protesting issues they're passionate about.

Seaside community has a history of speaking out

Protesters at Look At Me Now Headland at Emerald Beach were a regular sight in the early 90s.

The Coffs Coast Advocate documented one such gathering in 1994 with everybody holding hands and a news chopper hovering above.

The Coffs Coast Advocate has been telling the news of the area for more than 100 years.

They were opposed to plans for an ocean sewage outfall at the headland.

Protesters at Emerald Beach were a regular sight during the early 90s.
Protesters at Emerald Beach were a regular sight during the early 90s.

Esther Lydia was one of the protesters and shared her memories on our Flashback Friday Facebook post.

"We were all holding hands showing a united front for what we all believed to be an important cause," she wrote.

"What I can remember (as I was a teenager at the time) is that the helicopter was a news crew. It was really good to see so many people up on the headland."

They were all chanting: 'No way ocean outfall you ain't pushing through. We want to keep our beaches clean and healthy for me and you.'

Stephen Regan added: "I was there. I was only really young but yeah. Good times."

Greg Hawken also shared his memories from the day -  "Yes my wife Kim and I were there that day... mid 1990s.
I was a local teacher with Marine Biology qualifications. I initially fought with the NBEC (Northern Beaches Effluent Committee) to defeat the Ocean Outfall at Woopi Headland and then joined in with Mark Engleby et al to fight with STOP to prevent the outfall occurring at Look at Me Now Headland.

"Kim, my wife, was the director at Bo Bo and Mopsey's Pre School at Emerald Beach later to become Wavesong Pre School. Many of our student's parents including myself were arrested in the famous Emerald Beach Blockade.
This was a great day to celebrate our victory over Coffs Council to protect the waters of the Solitary Island Marine Park...the rest is history.... Save Our Seas."

The Emerald Beach community has a history of standing up for issues they feel strongly about.

In December 2018 a large group gathered on the highway near a site that has been extensively cleared and burned.

The Coffs Coast Advocate was there to document the protest.

RELATED: Protesters say environmental laws not cutting through

Emerald Beach residents concerned about flooding from a proposed development north of the caravan park protested in 2015.
Emerald Beach residents concerned about flooding from a proposed development north of the caravan park protested in 2015.

Also making news in 1994:

- Coffs Harbour supermarkets were given two months to clean up the city's 'feral' shopping trolley problem or face the consequences.

- The waters off Coffs Harbour must be made of healthy stuff as they have produced another giant - a tiger shark weighing in at 308kg. It took Mr John Elvery almost two hours to land the shark on a 15kg line. It was a club record.

- Thieves got away with an unusual haul when they netted 10 exotic fish from a pond despite security patrols and movement sensors.

- The new 500m mangrove boardwalk was completed at Coffs Creek Reserve. Costing about $70,000 in materials , the boardwalk took six months to build as a joint project between Coffs Harbour City Council, the Department of Public Works and Jobskills.

- At the end of June, the $2.5m Coffs Harbour International Stadium was officially handed over to the community.



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