SAFETY FIRST: Even in the absence of electricity hazards boaties should remember to Look Up And Live when they travel.
SAFETY FIRST: Even in the absence of electricity hazards boaties should remember to Look Up And Live when they travel. Matt Deans

Sail safely near electricity

BOATIES and fishers are being reminded to consider electrical safety when setting sail.

Essential Energy regional manager Brendon Neyland said overhead powerlines were often located close to marinas and car parks where boats and water craft are launched.

"Simple checks before you take to the water help keep you and your crew safe,” he said.

"Look for signage warning of powerlines in the area as tall masts and aerials can contact the wires when boats are being launched or retrieved.

"Always keep an eye on the weather as overhead powerlines can sway in the wind and vessels may be blown towards them.

"Clearance distances will also reduce during king tides, floods or when hot weather causes power lines to sag.”

He said submarine cables also pose a hazard when dropping and raising anchors or when water levels covering them are particularly low.

"Carry a mobile phone or two-way radio to call for assistance if your boat contacts a powerline or a submarine cable.

"The safest approach is to stay in the boat and dial Triple-0 but don't jump into the water.

""If your boat is made of fibreglass do not touch any metal parts including the mast or guys in contact with the powerline.”

Look Up And Live stickers are available from NSW Roads And Maritime Service, major boat sheds and sailing clubs for attaching to vessels to record their height.



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