FIFA President Sepp Blatter holding up the name of Qatar during the official announcement of the 2022 World Cup host country at the FIFA headquarters in Zurich. Football's world governing body FIFA has cleared on November 13, 2014 the 2022 World Cup hosts Qatar of corruption and ruled out a re-vote to decide the host of the competition despite widespread allegations of wrongdoing.
FIFA President Sepp Blatter holding up the name of Qatar during the official announcement of the 2022 World Cup host country at the FIFA headquarters in Zurich. Football's world governing body FIFA has cleared on November 13, 2014 the 2022 World Cup hosts Qatar of corruption and ruled out a re-vote to decide the host of the competition despite widespread allegations of wrongdoing. AFP PHOTO - Philippe Desmazes

Questions need to be asked over FIFA

SEPP Blatter, it seems, has the best job in the world - quite simply because it looks as if he is accountable to nobody.

Even Queen Elizabeth answers to someone.

There is an election in a few month's time for the FIFA presidency, of which Blatter holds the position and has done so since 1998.

By then the Swiss would have been at FIFA for 40 years, so, you would think he must be doing something right.

If that is the case, however, why is there so much controversy?

If you believe the man who was the world football governing body's independent ethics investigator - American lawyer Michael Garcia - who was employed to take a look at, among other things, the bidding processes for the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, all is not well.

Garcia was one of the key contributors to the investigation, with German judge Hans-Joachim Eckert, chairman of FIFA's ethics committee, producing a highly controversial synopsis of the findings last week.

That prompted Garcia to say Eckert's report contained, "numerous materially incomplete and erroneous representations of the facts and conclusions". Blatter must surely be held accountable over the workings of FIFA, even though, nothing ever seems to stick when talk of corruption is bandied around.

Somehow he always seems to be on the periphery when talk of corruption rears its head, but when it comes down to it, surely someone somewhere has to be asking the question: Just how much does Blatter know?

The Swiss seems to be a master of deflecting blame and still is able to steer the FIFA ship, however leaky that might be, through stormier and stormier waters.

I am still trying to work out how those bidding countries such as England and Australia were taken to task and both had questions to answer over the process.

If Australia's bid team was dubious, as Eckert's report suggested, then how come it only got one vote in return for a $46m investment?

England's Football Association chairman Greg Dyke attacked the contents of Eckert's report, and has called for Garcia's full investigation to be released.

"Questions still need to be answered," Dyke said last week.

I agree, but I think the biggest question now is, just how much longer can Blatter survive?



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