Bo Oliffe surrounded by his siblings in hospital in Brisbane.
Bo Oliffe surrounded by his siblings in hospital in Brisbane.

Parents reveal grief over son's failed heart donation

A CLERMONT family is devastated after learning they won't be able to donate their son's vital organs because his death had to be referred to the Coroner.

But the parents of 22-year-old Bo Oliffe, who died on Tuesday last week after fighting for his life in a Brisbane Hospital for a month, are still questioning why they were unable to donate his organs.

Karen and Neil Oliffe hadn't thought of donating at first.

"My mother asked me had we thought about it," Mr Oliffe said. "At first I wasn't real impressed with what she said but after I sat down and thought about it, I thought well it's a good way of Bo helping other people."

They filled out the paperwork and signed the forms, but were later told that given the circumstances of his death, his body needed to be examined to give the Coroner an understanding of the various factors that may have contributed to his death.

 

22-year-old Clermont man Bo Oliffe was involved in a serious crash in June.
22-year-old Clermont man Bo Oliffe was involved in a serious crash in June.

They were able to donate Bo's kidneys, but all of the organs from around his chest needed to be examined, which was upsetting to the Clermont family.

"It's over and done with, if they can't figure out what happened just leave it," Mr Oliffe said.

"There was nobody else hurt, he didn't hurt anyone else, if he could save somebody else potentially they should just let him go." According to a DonateLife Queensland spokesperson, an unnatural death is automatically referred to the Coroner for investigation as per the Coroners Act (2003).

 

Bo Oliffe was in hospital for a month, before he died.
Bo Oliffe was in hospital for a month, before he died. Contributed

They said organs were no longer medically viable for transplantation following an autopsy.

"DonateLife Queensland follows the direction of the Queensland Coroner when determining whether specific organs can be donated or not," the spokesperson said. However, Mr Oliffe said by undergoing the investigation, it wasn't going to bring back his 22-year-old son.

"He's dead, you are not going to bring him back, if his heart and lungs could have saved somebody else, then so be it, let somebody else have that gift of life."

Mr Oliffe said knowing that Bo could have saved somebody else's kid, to prevent their parents going through what he and his wife had, would have been satisfying. "It would have been nice to know that Bo's heart was beating somewhere," Mrs Oliffe added.

The couple watched for a month as their son fought for his life in a Brisbane hospital, after he car crashed into a tree on Drummond St, Clermont on June 18. Each day they would sit by him from morning until night and occasionally play him music.

When they left Clermont, the doctors told them their was a 99.9% chance that he was not going to make it, and it was at that point that Mrs Oliffe knew it was over for her son. They are now back in Clermont, coming to terms with their son's death.

"There are little triggers around the place that will set off the tears, but there are also a lot of happy memories around the place," she said.



Police Operation Rapid

Police Operation Rapid

Coffs Clarence Detective Inspector Darren Jameson talks about traffic blitz.

Rebels injury toll rises ahead of tough road to finals

premium_icon Rebels injury toll rises ahead of tough road to finals

French, Smidt out for last two home and away games

Police renew appeal to locate wanted man

Police renew appeal to locate wanted man

Police searching for 25-year-old wanted for several offences.

Local Partners