A black footed albatross chick with plastics in its stomach lies dead on Midway Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Each year the agency removes about 20 tons of plastic and debris that washes ashore from surrounding waters.
A black footed albatross chick with plastics in its stomach lies dead on Midway Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Each year the agency removes about 20 tons of plastic and debris that washes ashore from surrounding waters. Dan Clark/USFWS

OPINION: Plastic bag ban shows our laziness

THE single-use plastic bag ban has been in full swing for more than two weeks in NSW and the theatrics and reactions to this change have been shocking.

Some have been running around like headless chooks because they are mildly inconvenienced, and some who have been using reusable bags for years are completely unphased.

I don't really understand how leaving a couple reusable bags in your car is as strenuous and time consuming as people have reacted, it's as if the world has gone mad.

If your reasoning to complain and be rude to staff is because you solely can't be bothered to put a reusable bag in your car before shopping I have no sympathy for you.

In the lead up to the impending ban we were warned about what was going to happen, so why the theatrics?

Staff have been abused, ridiculed and have had to smile while obscene members of the public speak their unpleasant thoughts on the ban because they simply can't handle to live without a plastic bag, which will be thrown away minutes after its use.

It's no surprise where the plastic ends up and its environmental impact, so why are we deciding to turn a blind eye?

Do you want to use a single-use bag that will choke and slowly kill wildlife or will go in the ground where it will be for hundreds of years?

It has been scarily estimated there will be more plastic than animals in the oceans by 2050.

The remnants of micro-plastics from the breakdown of plastic bags and other single-use plastics in the ocean are being found all around the world, even in Antarctica.

It's worrying that every piece of plastic used is still somewhere on this earth wreaking havoc.

Just taking a quick trip to just a supermarket and seeing how many items of plastic are readily to buy in the aisles is just one way to see the impact this would be making to the environment.

Are we simply lazy or just so set in our ways helping us easily turn a blind eye? We need to start holding ourselves accountable for our selfish actions.

The thousands of kilometres of trash in our oceans is the perfect example of the choices we have made to date.

Bigger manufactures globally need to be held accountable but deciding to decline to use a straw or a plastic bag is the step in the right direction.

If you do a grocery shop at any major supermarket and you try not to buy anything with plastic, you'll realise how consumed we are by our plastic use.

I think banning the single-use plastic bag is a nice step into the right direction to banning plastic all together. But, this out-of-touch knee jerk reaction proves us as a society are not ready to give up our selfish ways.

If we don't change our ways the next generation will be left to clean up the mess, when it may be too late. But what will be the tipping point of our plastic consumption?



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