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Doomsday prediction after TV bloodbath

Steve Smith of Australia is caught behind by England's Jos Buttler during the First ODI of the 2018 Australia v England ODI Series at Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne, Sunday, January 14, 2018. (AAP Image/Tracey Nearmy) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY, IMAGES TO BE USED FOR NEWS REPORTING PURPOSES ONLY, NO COMMERCIAL USE WHATSOEVER, NO USE IN BOOKS WITHOUT PRIOR WRITTEN CONSENT FROM AAP
Steve Smith of Australia is caught behind by England's Jos Buttler during the First ODI of the 2018 Australia v England ODI Series at Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne, Sunday, January 14, 2018. (AAP Image/Tracey Nearmy) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY, IMAGES TO BE USED FOR NEWS REPORTING PURPOSES ONLY, NO COMMERCIAL USE WHATSOEVER, NO USE IN BOOKS WITHOUT PRIOR WRITTEN CONSENT FROM AAP

CRICKET: Props to you if you sat down in front of the TV on Sunday night and watched the cricket as Australia flopped to a 4-1 series loss against England.

With a 20th grand slam title on the line for Roger Federer in the Australian Open men's final on the same night, it's hard to see why almost a million more Aussies tuned in to Channel Seven as the summer's last one-day international - a dead rubber - carried out.

Not even former ODI star David Hussey could find it in him to watch the clash which eventually saw Australia bowled out 12 runs short of England's seemingly below-par 259 total.

Hussey, who played 69 ODIs as a batsman for the national side, said the game's 50-over format has just about run its course, citing the growing appeal of franchise T20 cricket as a major factor in its imminent demise.

The former limited-overs batsman said he could see one-day internationals thrown out in the not too distant future.

"I don't think it's too far away," he said. "Outside of the World Cup, I'm not really interested in the 50-over format.

"I'm more interested in the T20 competitions throughout the world and whose making 50 runs off 20 balls and making hundreds off 50 balls. It's a really exciting game."

Let’s face it, it wasn’t a fun series.
Let’s face it, it wasn’t a fun series.

Hussey said it was a shame even former players like himself have come to lose interest in the game's middle sibling format.

"It's unfortunate, being a cricket lover and being on the outside now, I always like to see if Australia is doing well or doing poorly and you want to support your friends that you played with," he said.

With matches taking up an entire afternoon and night, a blatant lack of action in the middle overs and Australia performing at record-low levels in coloured clothing, it's hard to disagree with the 40-year-old.

"It's six hours out of your day and a lot of people are time-poor and that's why everyone is gravitating to T20, it's more exciting, it's more unpredictable," he said.

"Whereas the one-day format, there is an exciting part, which is the first 10 overs, then there is a bit of boredom and then there is excitement at the back end of the innings.

"Maybe they can reinvent it with a couple more power plays in the 50-over format, but for mine I'm really enjoying the T20 format at the moment."

Will it last?
Will it last?

Meanwhile, Steve Smith has made the suggestion England's powerhouse approach to ODI cricket could be their downfall as the countdown for the 2019 World Cup enters its final year.

The Aussie skipper admitted the tourists outplayed his embattled Aussie unit but said their aggressive brand could land them in hot water.

"England have played a different brand of cricket where they go really hard the whole time. That can be risky as well at times, particularly in big tournaments. You might get yourselves to the semi-finals or something but you can have those days where you get bowled out for 150," he said.

"There are a few things to think about in regards to one-day cricket and the way we want to play. We just haven't been good enough, to be honest, the last couple of weeks and the last year.

"[England] are clear in the way they play. They're all very aggressive and go out there and take the game on from ball one. I don't think our players aren't clear, we're just not executing it and making the right decisions at key times. If we get those decisions right, and guys are smarter in the way they play in the middle, we'll turn things around."

Topics:  audience australia v england broadcasting cricket odi steve smith t20