DOMESTIC violence parolees could be fitted with GPS monitored ankle bracelets, if a trial last year is deemed to have been successful.

Victims will be interviewed as part of the NSW government study, which will be used to determine whether the GPS monitoring of DV offenders should be rolled out across the state.

Justice NSW is paying the University of NSW $274,964 to evaluate the use of the tracking after last year trialling GPS tracking to monitor 60 domestic and family violence offenders.

Under the trial, victims had been given the option of receiving their own "partner device" which alerts them and Corrective NSW if their abuser breaches their AVO and comes near them.

 

Domestic violence Townsville generic
Domestic violence Townsville generic

Corrective staff also monitor the location of DV offenders in relation to the victim's residence or work to make sure they were not intentionally or unintentionally in proximity to the victim.

Ankle bracelets are regularly used for high-risk sex offenders and murderers, but up until the trial had not regularly been used for DV cases.

The evaluation will look at how successful the monitoring was and whether there were any breaches of the AVOs.

Corrections Minister David Elliott said the results would be used to decide whether DV monitoring should be rolled out statewide.

"The NSW government is focused on reducing domestic violence reoffending by holding perpetrators to account, and ensuring they receive targeted, evidence-based and timely interventions to change their behaviour," Mr Elliott said.

"These initiatives also increase support for victims."

Corrections Minister David Elliot says the study results would determine whether the GPS tracking system will be rolled out. Picture: Tim Pascoe
Corrections Minister David Elliot says the study results would determine whether the GPS tracking system will be rolled out. Picture: Tim Pascoe

A Department of Justice spokesman said the review would examine both victim and offender experiences.

"The study will assess the program's implementation, its effectiveness in reducing reoffending and any challenges or barriers," he said.

"It will also look at the experience of offenders and victims involved in the program."

A Corrective Services NSW spokeswoman said electronic monitoring would act as a "deterrent to offenders" and "extra layer" of supervision.

"While this is no silver bullet, it is an opportunity to further monitor these offenders while also providing their victims with meaningful, ongoing support."



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