Regional Manager at Momentum Collective Nerilee Scott with Noah who has moved into his new home.
Regional Manager at Momentum Collective Nerilee Scott with Noah who has moved into his new home. Marc Stapelberg

Noah finds his ark after 12 months living in hospital

FOR 12 months 20-year-old Lismore man Noah lived within the walls of a hospital because he had no home to be discharged to, but he now has a safe place to call home, and carers say "it opens up a whole new world to him".

Noah was unable to leave hospital because of a lack of suitable local housing for someone with autism and an intellectual disability.

His new haven in Lismore provided by Momentum Collective allows him to do what he loves - including listening to music and enjoying the company of his family.

Mother Pauline said seeing Noah move into his new home was a special moment.

"It was hard seeing Noah living in the hospital," she said.

"Thanks to the team at Momentum Collective, he now has a home that suits his needs, as well as a team of carers to provide around the clock support.

"He gets to live independently and do what he wants to do, like join a surfing group."

Pauline said she was excited to see Noah achieve his full potential.

"Stable accommodation has been the missing piece of the puzzle for Noah for a long time," she said.

"With the right care and support, I think the possibilities for him are endless."

Regional Manager at Momentum Collective Nerilee Scott said the home had been renovated and modified to provide a safe and nurturing environment.

"Noah has complex needs and there was no suitable accommodation in the area," Ms Scott explained.

"Now, he has a home to call his own, where he can build a happy, productive future."

"He was keen for us to reaffirm for him that this was definitely his home now, he was relieved to hear he has a permanent house."

Noah's House is one of numerous Momentum Collective properties in northern NSW which have been modified to suit people with disabilities.

Community Service Support Manager Tim Robertson said Noah likes the beach, has been doing exercise with his staff, and he loves to get out and about and enjoys food.

"The big drawcards for him are his family and seeing people he knows," Mr Robertson said.

"He was residing in the hospital for 12 months not because there was anything wrong with him but because he had nowhere to live.

"It's kind of like it's just got to the start for him and now his world can open up and he's living in the community which he can explore and engage in and start to do the things he likes.

"We weren't sure how he would take the change in environment but he's been overwhelmingly happy.

"Change is hard but it's been really good."



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