The married doctor also told the paramedic he was going home to have a nice dream about her and said her right breast felt good.
The married doctor also told the paramedic he was going home to have a nice dream about her and said her right breast felt good.

No suspension for doctor who grabbed paramedic’s breasts

A DOCTOR who groped a female paramedic on her right breast and tried to kiss her at a regional Queensland hospital has been publicly reprimanded for professional misconduct.

Dr David Mutasa, who had invited the paramedic into a private room to talk, grabbed her breast for several seconds and pulled her neck towards him, a disciplinary tribunal heard.

The paramedic told Dr Mutasa, who was a locum on call that night, that she smelt alcohol on his breath and accused him of drinking on the job, which he denied.

Dr Mutasa later approached the paramedic, telling her: "I really like you. I want to be with you''.

The married doctor also told the paramedic he was going home to have a nice dream about her and said her right breast felt good, Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal heard.

He had come into contact with the paramedic earlier that night, when he helped her to treat some injured people, who were taken to the hospital.

After the paramedic complained, Dr Mutasa was immediately stood down and his locum contract was terminated in 2015, the tribunal heard.

Zimbabwean-born Dr Mutasa, now 45, was originally charged with sexual assault, but pleaded guilty in Rockhampton District Court in 2017 to common assault, the tribunal heard.

The married doctor also told the paramedic he was going home to have a nice dream about her and said her right breast felt good.
The married doctor also told the paramedic he was going home to have a nice dream about her and said her right breast felt good.

The doctor, who was registered to practice in Australia in 2006, was fined $2000, to be paid as compensation to the paramedic, with no conviction recorded.

QCAT Judge John Allen said the assault by Dr Mutasa was very serious, his conduct was disgraceful and a gross departure from the standards expected of a medical practitioner.

He said it involved a serious invasion of the personal integrity of the paramedic, while she was isolated from her colleagues, and it had a significant impact on her.

She suffered post traumatic stress disorder and needed counselling and medical treatment, she lost enthusiasm for her job and relocated to another area, which had a financial impact on her.

Judge Allen said there was a sexual nature to the assault and there was a considerable power imbalance between the doctor and paramedic.

"The tribunal has no hesitation in finding that (Dr Mutasa's) behaviour constitutes professional misconduct,'' Judge Allen said.

As a result of being charged and his NSW clearance to work with children was cancelled, Dr Mutasa lost his employment in that State in March, 2017.

Since then he has only worked for six days as a doctor.

In 2017, Dr Mutasa was convicted in Darwin of mid-range drink driving and last year he was convicted of high-range drink driving, with a blood-alcohol level of .30 per cent.

As a result, he has had conditions on his registration, which at times have prevented him from practising as a doctor. His registration expired on June 30.

The tribunal heard Dr Mutasa has been treated for an alcohol use disorder, which was in remission.

The tribunal on Tuesday publicly reprimanded the doctor, but decided not to suspend him, partly because of a five-month delay in the prosecution by the Health Ombudsman.



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