Caroline Dela Rose Nilsson has been charged with the murder of her mother-in-law, Myrna Nilsson. Picture: Facebook.
Caroline Dela Rose Nilsson has been charged with the murder of her mother-in-law, Myrna Nilsson. Picture: Facebook.

Apple Watch sets murder case timetable

THE Myrna Nilsson murder case has been delayed until January 2019 as prosecutors seek expert analysis of unprecedented, critical evidence from an Apple Watch worn at the time of the incident.

On Wednesday, the Adelaide Magistrates Court was told Ms Nilsson's grandchildren would also feature in the case when it eventually reaches trial, due to forensic analysis of samples taken from their hair.

Counsel for alleged murderer Caroline Dela Rose Nilsson did not object to the protracted delay - but foreshadowed their client was likely to make a third bid for release on bail before the end of 2018.

Nilsson, 26, is charged with murdering her mother-in-law Myrna Nilsson in her Valley View home on September 30, 2016.

She was found by a neighbour, bound and lying in the street, after the alleged murder.

Previously, the court heard Nilsson  told investigators her mother-in-law had been attacked by three men in a white tradesman's ute after a road rage incident. 

 

Alleged murder victim Myrna Nilsson with her son Mark . Picture: Facebook.
Alleged murder victim Myrna Nilsson with her son Mark . Picture: Facebook.

Prosecutors allege data from Myrna's smart watch disproves that account, having recorded 65 vigorous movements made by her in 39 seconds on the day of her death.

Nilsson has twice been denied bail, angering her husband - and Myrna's son - Mark, who says he wants his wife home with them and their children.

On Wednesday, prosecutor Steph Halliday said investigators required at least 24 weeks to complete the brief of evidence in the case.

"This will be a circumstantial case, and there's a very large volume of material which is outstanding," she said.

"Principally, that relates to the watch that was worn by the deceased at the time she was killed.

"There's some principal evidence in relation to this from a local expert but more advice and in-depth information is required.

"Police are still seeking to obtain a suitable expert and we expect that is going to take a long time."

She said security cameras installed around the Nilsson house also needed to be checked.

"They did not capture the events leading up to the death of the deceased," she said.

"There needs to be some expert evidence as to how and why they were not functioning at the time."

Ms Halliday said samples taken from the hair of Nilsson's children were being analysed and "that's expected to take some time".

Magistrate Paul Foley questioned whether such a long delay was necessary but Mark Twiggs, for Nilsson, said that it was.

He said it would ensure the case was trial-ready from the moment it reached the Supreme Court some time next year.

Mr Foley remanded Nilsson in custody until January.



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