The Greens will raise double jeopardy reforms in State Parliament on behalf of the families of Bowraville's murdered children.
The Greens will raise double jeopardy reforms in State Parliament on behalf of the families of Bowraville's murdered children.

Murder call rejected; Bowraville murders before parliament

THE families of three children murdered at Bowraville have vowed to continue their fight for justice as the NSW Greens prepare to reignite a parliamentary debate over the legislation that failed them.

NSW Attorney-General Greg Smith this week rejected calls for a royal commission and/or parliamentary inquiry into the unsolved deaths of Evelyn Greenup, Colleen Walker and Clinton Speedy-Duroux.

The news was delivered to devastated family members at a private meeting at Parliament House.

Leonie Duroux, Clinton's sister-in-law, said the family was told it was time to "let it go, leave the past behind and seek grief counselling".

She said Mr Smith told them he had reviewed the case and did not believe there was any evidence of corruption in the police investigation or fresh information that could lead to a conviction.

While Mr Smith and every senior police officer she had encountered in the past 22 years had insisted the investigation was not racially biased, Ms Duroux questioned why the names of the Bowraville children had never received the same recognition as other high-profile child killings.

She said authorities "would never have told Daniel Morcombe's parents to give up and move on" and her family could not be expected to give up their fight.

"If it had been three white kids and the suspect was a black man, we wouldn't be having this debate today."

Despite being bitterly disappointed at the decision, Ms Duroux hasn't given up hope and will eagerly await the result of a motion being tabled in NSW Parliament next week.

Greens MLC David Shoebridge accepted Mr Smith was bound by legislation but believed no amount of bureaucratic red tape could change the fact that a killer, whether it be the main suspect or someone else, had gotten away with the murder of three children.

He said on Friday the Bowraville tragedy had shed light on bigger issues and he would use it as an example when he called for an Upper House inquiry into the double jeopardy legislation.

If the motion did not receive the support of his colleagues, Mr Shoebridge believed forcing a debate on the issue would be a step in the right direction.

The motion will be tabled on Tuesday.



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