Winter southerly swells are the likely reason for the erosion on Seven Mile Beach at Lennox Head.
Winter southerly swells are the likely reason for the erosion on Seven Mile Beach at Lennox Head. Jay Cronan

Mother Nature's disappearing act

YOU'LL barely find space for your beach towel on some parts of Seven Mile Beach right now - and it's not due to an early influx of tourists.

In recent months, the sand on the southern end of Lennox Head's popular beach has been slowly disappearing.

It's most noticeable close to the town centre, where rocks and crumbling sand cliffs now stand in place of sandy beaches.

It may come as a shock if you're a newcomer, or haven't been to Lennox for a while, but according to long-time locals it's just Mother Nature doing her work.

Surfer and long time local Max Perrot believes the changing beach conditions are most likely due to southerly swells over winter, which have taken sand further up the coast.

Before then, there was more sand on local beaches than there had been in years, including a rarely seen beach at Lennox Point, which has made the recent sand loss seem more dramatic.

"If you're not used to seeing the beach like we are maybe you would be surprised," said surfer and local of 30 years, Kerryn Noach

But Ms Noach, who is at the beach most days, said the current conditions were no worse than any other time in the past.

She had seen the cycle repeated countless times and said it was no cause for alarm.

"Who's to say next time we get really big swells it won't come back again," she said.

Coastal experts agree that most, if not all sand removed from beaches by erosion returns naturally in due course.

Exactly when that will be however, is anyone's guess.



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