Map shows how likely you are to die in World War Three

Since self-confessed "stable genius" Donald Trump took the oath of office, the prospect of a nuclear war has seemed more likely.

With this in mind, a new map has been launched to demonstrate just how likely you would be to survive a nuclear blast.

This "Nuke Map", created by Alex Wellerstein, allows users to virtually drop a bomb anywhere in the world and also select the strength of the bomb in question.

Wellerstein has also created an app called Nukey McNukeface, designed for Android, that can help users to discover how close they are to North Korea's nuclear strike zone. 

Though it's not just North Korea who have nuclear weapons. According to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, nine nuclear countries, including Britain, have a combined 15,000 nuclear weapons at their disposal.

But is it possible to survive a nuclear blast?

Around a third of the energy of an atomic bomb is released through thermal radiation, which travels at around the speed of light. This means that, even if you are standing thirteen miles away, you'll still be temporarily blinded by the light of the blast.

If you were standing seven miles away, you might need to be treated for mild first-degree burns. But within five miles of the blast zone, third-degree burns are likely.

If you were any closer, death is almost certain. The centre of the Hiroshima bomb, dropped by the USA in the Second World War, was estimated to be around 300,000 Celsius. That's about 250 times higher than the temperature at which most people are cremated.

Cheery, right?



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