DON'T GIVE UP: Receiving a mark below the cut-off isn't the end, says UAC.
DON'T GIVE UP: Receiving a mark below the cut-off isn't the end, says UAC. Trevor Veale

Low ATARs are not the end, says UAC

With ATARs being released, a lot of students may be scratching their heads over what it means for their pathway into university.

However, the University Admissions Centre has offered reassuring information to calm the nerves of school-leavers who may find the ATAR somewhat mystifying.

It's important for students to know receiving a mark above the cut-off for a course is not the be all and end all, as cut-offs include bonus points and many students below the cut-offs still get offers.

UAC also emphasised the HSC and the ATAR had two different functions, as the HSC is a certification and a set of raw results, while the ATAR is a scaled ranking used by universities to select applicants.

The scaling process can be a matter of confusion among students, but UAC said a scaling method was used for equity reasons as students and the marks they achieved in different courses could not be compared.

The process instead estimates a mark based on what it would have been if all students had taken the course.

Main round offers for university courses will be released at 6pm on Wednesday, January 18, and students can change their preferences until Friday, January 6.

UAC has estimated that about 25,000 students will change their preferences now they have received results, and they advise students not to be put off applying for courses with a higher cut-off.

If students do not receive an offer for their first preference, they will be considered for their second and so on until an offer is made, so there is nothing to lose, according to UAC.

For those who haven't applied for university yet, applications for study in the first semester of 2017 are open until Friday, February 10.



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