Mick Ticehurst and Ian Trow from Northern Tablelands Local Land Services Services at the bushfire emergency fodder collection point at Tenterfield Showground.
Mick Ticehurst and Ian Trow from Northern Tablelands Local Land Services Services at the bushfire emergency fodder collection point at Tenterfield Showground. LLS

LLS support 'bloody unreal' in bushfires

ONE farmer has praised a "bloody unreal" effort to assist farmers whose properties had been devastated by fire.

As Coramba farmer Eliezer Robinson was on his own mission to assist farmers during the havoc caused by the Bees Nest fire, he saw something that touched him more than anything else.

"The Local Land Services were bloody unreal, they were there with semi-loads of hay giving farmers two bales of good hay," he said.

"That really touched me, they were in there doing it straight away. I felt sorrow but was happy seeing that."

Northern Tablelands LLS general manager Paul Hutchings said providing assistance to farmers was all part of the plan when a disaster of this scale occurred and they became activated as a "combat agency" in support of the RFS.

"There are a number of functional support areas and ours is agriculture and animal services," he said.

"Our core business is working with farmers and primary producers and we provide them with emergency fodder and water for their livestock and we also send teams of veterinary staff out in the field to assess livestock.

"It is an emergency supply and people, particularly if they have not been through a disaster before, find it amazing that the government has rural based people ready to help out."

Mr Hutchings is no stranger to disaster, after his 700 acre property was burnt out in the fires at Tingha Plateau.

He said two other LLS staff had experienced the same during this last fire event.

"Our people are primary producers and live locally and we know where people are coming from," he said.

"It is a challenging experience having to defend your own home and then have to deal with fences destroyed and losing livestock."

While many larger producers knew of the services provided, Mr Hutchings acknowledged some smaller producers might not know how important it was to register with LLS.

"That's why it's important that people have what we call PICs which are property identification codes," he said.

"If you are running livestock, even on small blocks, we need to know so that if these sort of incidents happen we can contact people and assist."

Registering or updating details with LLS also ensured appropriate information could be disseminated in the event of a disease outbreak.



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