GOING HARD: Grant Rawlinson and Charlie Smith row past Cristo Rei on their 12,000km Home to Home trip.
GOING HARD: Grant Rawlinson and Charlie Smith row past Cristo Rei on their 12,000km Home to Home trip. Alistair Harding

Kiwi ready to roll into Coffs on 12,000km adventure

SITTING at his home in Singapore, Grant Rawlinson is crossing the days off the calendar until he touches down in Australia and cycles close to 4000km to Coffs Harbour.

Grant is no stranger to extreme feats of endurance however, having previously climbed to the top of Mt Everest.

Now the Kiwi's latest adventure will have him travel from Singapore to New Zealand, a journey he has called "Rowing from Home to Home”.

To challenge himself, he has set out to tackle the 12,000km journey using only human-powered means of transport over three stages.

Grant, 42, finished the first leg of his epic journey last month with rowing partner Charlie Smith, from England, but hit Darwin in the middle of the wet season.

To avoid the storms and cyclones, he flew back to his current base in Singapore.

He will next touch down in Australia's Top End on May 15 and then leave the day after on a bike borrowed from his wife, Stephanie.

Grant said the cycling leg would be the easiest.

"(For) the bike ride, I haven't done any preparation or training,” he said.

"The bike part is a piece of wee.

"I ride across there (to Coffs Harbour), it shouldn't take that long.”

Grant said he was aiming for Coffs Harbour as it was essentially the closest point in Australia to New Zealand.

He said he expected to cross the Tasman Sea in about 60 days, based on the five other successful efforts of people crossing in row boats.

But Grant has not yet set a launch date for the final leg of his journey.

He said more planning was needed before he took to the water in his trusty craft, "Simpson's Donkey”, again.

Grant said his row boat was named after the heroic donkey Jack Simpson Kirkpatrick rode in the First World War, which helped save hundreds of injured soldiers and symbolised courage and bravery.

As to why Grant chose to throw himself into this trip some would deem a nightmare, he simply said it was because of the adventure.

"I'm doing this purely for the adventure, mate,” he said.

Grant said he was more focused on the journey ahead in this world-first expedition, rather than the final destination.

You can follow Grant's progress online at www.axeoneverest.com.



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