Indian myna birds are capable of evicting larger and more aggressive native birds from their nests.
Indian myna birds are capable of evicting larger and more aggressive native birds from their nests.

Intoduced pests threat to indigenous species

COFFS COAST residents are being urged to trap or report sightings of two introduced pests, Indian myna birds and foxes.

“Non-native birds and animals are a constant threat to our indigenous species,” Coffs Harbour City Council senior biodiversity officer Nigel Cotsell said.

“Not only do they compete for food and habitats, but foxes are identified as a threat to livestock, pets and around 40 threatened native species such as bandicoots, little terns and the Bellinger freshwater turtle.

“Getting rid of these pests will help maintain the special ecology of this area.”

The council has joined conservation groups and the Department of Environment and Climate Change in a predator control program.

If you want to become involved, contact the council on 6648 4000.

The Indian myna is now regularly identified as the most dominant bird in our urban landscape.

It is a medium-sized chocolate-brown bird with a black head and neck and yellow beak, yellow eye patch and yellow feet and legs.

They use their numbers or family groups to take over territory traditionally used by our native birds and they aggressively defend their home range from intruders.

Locally so far this year, 1600 mynas have been trapped and destroyed.



What to do in a powerline emergency

What to do in a powerline emergency

Tips on what to do if you hit a powerline.

Sharks spotted at several Coffs Coast beaches

premium_icon Sharks spotted at several Coffs Coast beaches

Sharks spotted by aerial patrols at Coffs Coast beaches this morning

Up to speed on Rally Australia running in 2019

Up to speed on Rally Australia running in 2019

2019 WRC rally calendar announcement pending

Local Partners