WE MUST HELP: The drought has seen countless animals die in front of farmers' eyes.
WE MUST HELP: The drought has seen countless animals die in front of farmers' eyes. Brook Mitchell/Getty Images

In tough times good will shines through

Letters to the Editor

CONGRATULATIONS to all the people exercising their compassionate citizenship in providing aid and assistance to those affected by this current crippling drought.

I would ask that people spare a thought for people in business in drought-affected areas.

Farmers are not the only ones doing it hard - those small businesses that provide goods and services are also doing it extra tough.

By spending money at our local Coles and Woolies on items to donate is commendable but this is sending the local merchants in drought areas broke and while the farms will come back with the rain, the local business landscape will be a permanent desert.

Supporting charities that give out purchase certificates to farmers so they can support their local businesses will do more good than receiving a hamper.

Peter Farquhar

East Coast Cabinets

 

 

Dog owners have been put on noticed by a local landholder.
Dog owners have been put on noticed by a local landholder. Contributed

PET OWNERS PUT ON NOTICE BY FARMER

IN REGARDS to the Thumbs Up Thumbs Down post about the shooting of dogs on private property (CCA, Wednesday, August 1) in which this gentleman did a letter drop stating that dogs found on his property would be shot.

Responsible owners of dogs or cats should look after their pets and keep them in their own home where they belong, not roaming on his or anyone else's property.

He has his sheep and any other animals on his property to care for.

So yes, he has put it out there, notifying people what to expect if dogs or cats are on his property. If the owners cannot care for their own pets then stiff.

They are your pets. Your responsibility. They are your problem.

If you have animals, keep them in your own yard.

Rabbit

 

 

A reader calls on pedestrians to be mindful of traffic in the Coffs city centre.
A reader calls on pedestrians to be mindful of traffic in the Coffs city centre. Trevor Veale

THINK OF MOTORISTS BEFORE CROSSING

HERE are a few points for pedestrians to consider before blindly walking out onto a crossing or the shared zone on Park Ave.

Some new cars have large A pillars, causing a blind spot.

Drivers have to watch the car in front, look left and right, contend with (at various times) sun or headlights in the eyes and you walking out from behind a parked or stationary vehicle.

So next time you have a close call from walking out from behind a parked vehicle, texting on your mobile phone into the blind spot created by an A pillar while the driver is contending with sun in their eyes, instead of abusing them, consider how lucky you were that the driver saw you in time and stopped.

Bruce Nicholson

 

 

A renowned Tasmanian photographer has spent several painstaking days climbing great heights to capture the perfect image of a 250-year-old tree located near Bellingen, which is set to be logged under new laws.
A renowned Tasmanian photographer has spent several painstaking days climbing great heights to capture the perfect image of a 250-year-old tree located near Bellingen, which is set to be logged under new laws. Steven Pearce

OUR FORESTS ARE GOING, GOING, GONE

I WAS saddened to see the photo in the Coffs Coast Advocate (July 28) of the magnificent 250-year-old blackbutt tree near Bellingen, which will soon be logged and be no more.

Two hundred and fifty years is a long, long time and how long will it take to kill this superb habitat and succession tree? An hour? Thirty minutes? And then it is gone forever.

After reading Jasmine Minha's article, which accompanied the photo, I did some research.

I was horrified to learn that the State Government is desperate for timber to fulfil its obligations to the timber company Boral.

In order to get more timber our Liberal National Party State Government has changed their maps and rules, so 100,000ha (that's 247,105 acres) of coastal land from Taree to Grafton can be clear felled and 88 per cent of mapped high-conservation value old growth and 62 per cent of mapped rainforest is slated to be logged and/or clear felled.

How can this sort of wholesale destruction be justified?

Will we be left with stick forests or monoculture Blackbutt plantations?

The State Government's policies with regard to logging in state forests seem extremely short-sighted, narrow and brutal.

They don't seem to care about protecting our natural environment, our wildlife, threatened species, tourism, biodiversity, natural beauty, preserving old-growth forests and rainforests. Surely timber is about a lot more than just money.

Driving in Europe on holidays, I remember remarking that we never saw any road kill. I later came to realise that there is almost no wildlife left in Europe, hence no road kill.

I really don't want Australia to become a country like much of Europe, where there are very few trees and almost no visible signs of wildlife.

The fox has been in charge of the hen house for long enough.

Bring on the next state election.

Kathleen Fanning



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