President Donald Trump waves as he arrives on Air Force One at Morristown Municipal Airport, en route to Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, New Jersey. Picture: AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster
President Donald Trump waves as he arrives on Air Force One at Morristown Municipal Airport, en route to Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, New Jersey. Picture: AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

Impeachment not what Trump has to worry about right now

IT'S been a disastrous week for Donald Trump, whose widely denounced behaviour with Vladimir Putin in Helsinki led to some monumental flip-flopping over his stance on Russia.

The President was confused and angered at the bipartisan criticism, with his aides going into damage control and struggling to pick up the pieces as his continued comedy of errors continued.

But the former reality star's terrible seven days have ended with surprising evidence that nothing can touch Mr Trump, as it emerged the past seven days have done little to lower his status with the public.

While some have been declaring it the end of days, the Russia debacle has not persuaded any more Democrats to support impeachment, with many stating they are too busy getting on with the job of supporting the nation.

The President first realised how badly his Monday summit with the Russian leader had been received when he started reviewing the negative news coverage on the plane home, according to the Washington Post.

He tweeted about his confidence in his intelligence community - but even they were releasing statements expressing their horror at his capitulation.

Mr Trump complained about the journalist who asked whether he would denounce Russia interference in the 2016 US election at his news conference with Mr Putin, insisting he was being tactical by not alienating his counterpart.

Despite the criticism of his summit with Vladimir Putin, the US President has shown it is now almost impossible to seriously damage his status. Picture: AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais
Despite the criticism of his summit with Vladimir Putin, the US President has shown it is now almost impossible to seriously damage his status. Picture: AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Then, he concocted a bizarre "double negative" excuse to explain his remarks that he did not believe Russia meddled - despite what his intelligence agents said.

But he ruined the effect on Wednesday, when he said, "No," in answer to a reporter's question on whether he believed Russians were still targeting the United States.

This time, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders delayed her afternoon press conference until she could reach Mr Trump, before confirming: "I talked to the President. He wasn't answering that question. He was saying, no, he's not taking questions."

And there was yet another fire to put out. One journalist asked whether Mr Trump would really agree to Mr Putin's "interesting idea" that Robert Mueller could visit Russia to question hacking suspects in exchange for Russian officials interrogating US citizens.

Ms Sanders did not rule it out, causing serious concern from the State Department and National Security Council.

After a Thursday morning meeting, she finally did so, saying the President had decided against the proposal.

But he was about to drop another bombshell. That afternoon, the White House announced that Mr Trump was planning to meet Mr Putin again in Washington in autumn.

The final sting in the tail was the Friday revelation the FBI had a recording of Mr Trump discussing a hush payment to a Playboy model who said she had slept with the President with his former lawyer Michael Cohen.

The 74-year-ol has fiercely defended himself.

But perhaps the most incredible revelation came this weekend.

The Washington Post found that despite a negative public reaction to the Helsinki summit, most Americans do not feel Mr Trump went "too far" in supporting Mr Putin.

While more Americans say US leadership has become weaker rather than stronger, his ratings on this question are slightly improved from last autumn.

And The Hill found no surge in support for impeachment among Democrats.

"At this point in time it would be a distraction. There will be time for that," said Democratic whip Steny Hoyer.

"We need to get through this election; we need to deal with the economic issues; we need to deal with the health care issues of the American people."

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said Congress wanted to stay focused on "honouring our oath of office to protect and defend the Constitution and our country. That's our fight."



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