No one wants to catch coronavirus, but a new study now shows the neurological impacts of the illness may last much longer than the symptoms.

Researchers have warned that coronavirus could cause a significant long-term impact in brain function, with severe infections linked to a loss of brain function akin to ageing 10 years.

The horrifying news is just one of a raft of reported symptoms and effects of the virus, which is still somewhat of a mystery almost a year after first emerging in Wuhan, China. 

"People who had recovered, including those no longer reporting symptoms, exhibited significant cognitive deficits," the study published on MedRxiv said.

"The deficits were broad, affecting multiple cognitive domains," the researchers wrote in the study, which has yet to be peer reviewed.

Meanwhile, pressure on Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has been mounting all week to reveal whether her state would go ahead with its plan to open up to NSW on November 1. 

Ms Palaszczuk promised on Tuesday that "everyone will know by Friday" if the border reopening will go ahead. 

Her NSW counterpart Gladys Berejiklian continued the pair's war of words over the decision this morning, criticising Ms Palaszczuk for making the long-awaited announcement on the eve of the Queensland election. 

Speaking to 2GB's Ben Fordham on Wednesday morning, Ms Berejiklian said the timing is "rather cute". 

"I'm just so upset and frustrated as to why the border's been in place for so long," she said. 

"I just wish she had the courage to do it earlier." 

Horror hidden effect of virus

Coronavirus can significantly impact brain function, causing mental decline equivalent to the brain ageing 10 years, according to an alarming new study.

A study of more than 84,000 people in the UK found that coronavirus left even those deemed recovered with "chronic cognitive consequences" that it compared to dropping 8.5 IQ points.

"People who had recovered, including those no longer reporting symptoms, exhibited significant cognitive deficits," the study published on MedRxiv said.

"The deficits were broad, affecting multiple cognitive domains," the researchers wrote in the study, which has yet to be peer reviewed.

The study used cognitive tests - such as remembering words or joining dots on a puzzle - that are often used to assess brain performance in diseases like Alzheimer's.

The cognitive deficits were "of substantial effect size" and "scaled with symptom severity," especially those hospitalised, but also "evident among those without hospital treatment," the study said.

-Lee Brown, New York Post

Dr Fauci: Australia's done 'quite well'

America's top COVID-19 expert Dr Anthony Fauci has praised Victoria's miraculous recovery from its second wave of coronavirus.

Speaking in a University of Melbourne panel discussion with Doherty Institute director Sharon Lewin, Dr Fauci said Australia had done "quite well" handling the pandemic.

"I would like to say the same for the United States, but the numbers speak for themselves," he said.

Dr Fauci said Victorians in particular were worthy of admiration for how wholeheartedly they have embraced masks.

"I really wish that we could transplant that kind of mentality here, because masks in the United States have almost become a political statement," he said.

"People were ridiculed for wearing masks, it depended on which side of a political spectrum you were at, which is so painful to me as a physician, a scientist and a public health person - to see such divisiveness centred around a public health issue.

"If there's one area of life that there should not be divisiveness, it is in the health of your nation."

The full panel discussion is on the University of Melbourne YouTube channel.


Qld border call in just over 24 hours

It's been one of the most contentious issues of Australia's COVID-19 pandemic - and we could know the fate of Queensland's border with NSW in just over 24 hours.

Pressure on Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has been mounting all week to reveal whether her state would go ahead with its plan to open up to NSW on November 1.

Ms Palaszczuk promised on Tuesday that "everyone will know by Friday" if the border reopening will go ahead.

Her NSW counterpart Gladys Berejiklian continued the pair's war of words over the decision this morning, criticising Ms Palaszczuk for making the long-awaited announcement on the eve of the Queensland election.

Speaking to 2GB's Ben Fordham on Wednesday morning, Ms Berejiklian said the timing is "rather cute".

"I'm just so upset and frustrated as to why the border's been in place for so long," she said.

"I just wish she had the courage to do it earlier."

Ms Palaszczuk hit back, saying the border was closed because she has "the courage to stand up for what is right, I have the courage to keep Queenslanders safe".

"It's disappointing to see the NSW Premier try to be political at this time when she has enough of her own issues to deal with," she said.

"This is simply a diversion from what is happening with herself down in NSW."

 

 

 

Originally published as Horror hidden virus symptom revealed



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