Hi-tech methods track tsunami

TSUNAMI author Professor Ted Bryant of the University of Wollongong has explained how the tsunami was tracked across the Pacific with deep sea ocean buoys monitoring the potential for destruction.

The information taken on the ocean floor was relayed to transponders on the surface and via satellite to the tsunami warning centre, he said.

After minor surges were felt in Hawaii and New Zealand the threat in NSW was downplayed to a low risk by seismologists.

Had it been greater the tsunami warning system would have automatically called homes on the coast with an automated warning message.

“We know within the minute when the wave will come into contact with any shoreline, the uncertainty is not where the tsunami will occur but with what force,” Professor Bryant said.

The Joint Australian Tsunami Warning Centre urged the public to stay clear of coastal foreshores and watch out for strong ocean currents and minor flooding.

Rising seas were recorded in Norfolk Island, Southport in Tasmania and at Port Kembla in the NSW Illawarra.

Fortunately nature worked against itself, with an outgoing tide hitting Australia’s east coast on Sunday afternoon.



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