Professor Peter Albion, a University of Southern Queensland teaching academic, presented at the Griffith University’s Digital Technologies Summit in Brisbane on June 15, 2016.
Professor Peter Albion, a University of Southern Queensland teaching academic, presented at the Griffith University’s Digital Technologies Summit in Brisbane on June 15, 2016. Sherele Moody

Helping teachers make sense of digital in a changing world

EVOLUTION is the key to ensuring today's children have the technology skills they need to excel in the world beyond tomorrow.

Griffith University Professor Donna Pendergast is one of the people leading the digital learning revolution.

Prof Pendergast oversaw Griffith University's Digital Technologies Summit in Brisbane this week, where 300 education professionals from across Queensland gathered.

The Queensland Council of Deans of Education chairwoman said teachers had to be across digital technologies for the sake of their students' futures.

"Like with numeracy, we believe that all of our teachers need to be able to use technology effectively and appropriately in terms of teaching and learning," she said.

"It's not about computer teachers getting better at using computers - it's actually about the whole cohort of teachers being competent users of digital technologies.

"It's also developing the capacity in young learners to be expert at learning new things so they have confidence and competence to keep evolving as technology evolves."

University of Southern Queensland education specialist Peter Albion said educators' jobs were bound to get a little tougher next year when the new digital curriculum rolled out across the country.

"There's been a lot of talk about digital technologies, coding as the new literacy, STEM (science, technology, education and maths),a whole swathe of things and the new technologies curriculum is being introduced," Prof Albion said.

"Trying to get a handle on all of that stuff, where it fits together and what it means in schools, is a bit of challenge," he said.

Prof Albion said some teachers could struggle, particularly because technology was continually changing.

"There's stuff in the digital technologies curriculum that will be unfamiliar to a lot of teachers," he said.

"Part of the problem will be a lack of familiarity with this stuff - there are concepts with digital technology that they haven't had much exposure to.

"But technology also changes so rapidly so even for those who are comfortable with it, the next thing they turn around and it's all very different."

- ARM Newsdesk



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