BETTER CHOICES: Peter O'Dwyer has lost 60kg and encourages men of all ages to start making healthy lifestyle changes during Men's Health Week. INSET: Mr O'Dwyer pictured in 2010.
BETTER CHOICES: Peter O'Dwyer has lost 60kg and encourages men of all ages to start making healthy lifestyle changes during Men's Health Week. INSET: Mr O'Dwyer pictured in 2010. Glen Porteous

HEALTHY CHOICES: Not weak to speak about men's health

LOOKING after your physical and mental health is the message Peter O'Dwyer wants to get out during Men's Health Week.

This week is about reminding men and boys to make healthy lifestyle choices.

The theme will focus on what males can do to minimise their risk of developing heart disease.

Mr O'Dwyer encouraged men to get health checks done and live a better lifestyle.

"When it comes to mental and physical health, men need to talk and seek professional help and do something about it,” Mr O'Dwyer said.

"It's not weak to speak about your health in general and unfortunately men don't do it enough and suffer the consequences for it.”

Mr O'Dwyer weighed just over 163kg and got a reality check while on holidays with his wife in Vietnam.

A little girl was trying to sell hand fans to Mr O'Dwyer and after saying no to the fans she called him a "big fat Buddha always eating”.

After the necessary reality check, Mr O'Dwyer did something about his health by getting stomach sleeve surgery and a proper diet and now weighs just over 102kg.

"I feel so much better after losing the weight, my general overall health has improved greatly and I'm a lot more active,” he said.

"It took me about six months to lose the weight and make it happen but nothing is going to change unless you get up and do something about it.

"For whatever reason with so many health concerns there are with men, don't put it off getting checked out.”

Mr O'Dwyer said certain men's health problems don't discriminate due to age either.

Heart Foundation Queensland CEO Stephen Vines said heart disease was responsible for nearly 13 per cent of deaths of Australian men.

"Men aged 18 to 34 are more than twice as likely than their female counterparts to have four or more risk factors of heart disease,” Mr Vines said.

"The theme of this year's Men's Health Week is keeping boys and men healthy and focus on what males of any age can do to minimise the risk of developing heart problems later in life.”

Men's Health Week will go from June 10-16 and learn more menshealthweek.org.au.

It provides a platform for challenging and debating key issues in men's health and to raise the profile of men, their health outcomes and health needs around the country each June.



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