Arrawarra Headland
Arrawarra Headland

Hazard planning for Arrawarra re-visited

NORTHERN beaches' residents have renewed their calls to Coffs Harbour City Council to re-consider the placement of coastal hazard lines along Arrawarra headland and the broader Coffs Coast.
 

At the last council meeting, experts Judy Boyle and Dr Graeme Chaffey implored council to re-evaluate the data used to predict sea level rises in the IPCC report that Coffs Harbour City Council's Coastal Processes and Hazards Definitions Study is based on.

 

BEFORE AND AFTER:  Photos taken of Arrawarra Headland in 1943 and 2013 show the headland has changed very little in 70 years.
BEFORE AND AFTER: Photos taken of Arrawarra Headland in 1943 and 2013 show the headland has changed very little in 70 years. Contributed

The proposed lines in the draft coastal hazard planning policy predict sea levels will rise is for sea-level to rise 0.4m by 2050 and 0.9m by 2100.

Mrs Boyle expressed at the meeting that the lines are scientifically unsound because they are based on the extreme global mean sea level rise projections from the IPCC Assessment Report 2014.

The projections are based on global temperatures rising to up to 5.5 degrees Celsius, contrary to global experts who are forecasting a rise of two degree Celsius.  

 

Residents who fall within the hazard zone —between the purple line, the current immediate hazard zone, and the yellow line, the 2100 erosion estimates —are concerned their properties will plummet in value and jeopardise future development plans. The red line represents rare 2100 erosion estimates.
Residents who fall within the hazard zone —between the purple line, the current immediate hazard zone, and the yellow line, the 2100 erosion estimates —are concerned their properties will plummet in value and jeopardise future development plans. The red line represents rare 2100 erosion estimates. Contributed

Council resolved to defer the progression of its draft coastal hazard planning controls pending the outcome of the Minister for Planning's report to be provided in February.

Mrs Boyle said the outcome was a step in the right direction for council and for the residents living on the proposed lines, who may not be able to re-model their homes with permanent dwellings as a result.

"These people are paying huge rates and they're not very happy that their properties could be worthless so they (council) have to be more realistic about where the hazard lines go," she said.

Public submissions on the coastal planning policies attracted 111 submissions.     

*Correction: An earlier edition of the online and print story said 'sea levels were predicted to rise by 1.4m by 2100' instead of 0.9m. 



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