Cowper MP Luke Hartsuyker said any rights he had regarding Dutch citizenship automatically lapsed when he reached the age of 28, 15 years before he was first elected to Parliament.
Cowper MP Luke Hartsuyker said any rights he had regarding Dutch citizenship automatically lapsed when he reached the age of 28, 15 years before he was first elected to Parliament. Trevor Veale

Hartsuyker is a dinky-di Aussie

COWPER MP Luke Hartsuyker has no fears about declaring he isn't a dual citizen by either birth or ancestry.

As the pall of the citizenship saga continues to hang over Parliament House in Canberra, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull announced a plan today in a bid to clear up any doubts about the eligibility of MP's in both the House of Representatives and the Senate.

The Prime Minister announced that all federal politicians will be required to publicly detail their citizenship history and status.

Although Mr Hartsuyker's father was born in The Netherlands, Mr Hartsuyker has said by simply doing nothing, any claim he might've had to Dutch citizenship lapsed long ago.

While the Assistant Minister for for Agriculture and Water Resources was eligible for Dutch citizenship as a young man, Dutch law dictates that citizens born abroad who also held citizenship of the country of their birth lose Dutch Citizenship if they lived in the country of birth for 10 years after the age of 18 and were still citizens of their country of birth.

"Under Dutch law you may be regarded a national until the age of 28," Mr Hartsuyker said earlier this year.

He added that the Dutch Embassy in Canberra advised him he was no longer a Dutch National after taking no action to renew his Dutch nationality.

Simply by allowing any rights to lapse, no documentation or renouncement of Dutch citizenship is required.

Mr Hartsuyker, who was elected into Parliament at the age of 43, has stated in the past that he did not visit the Netherlands until he was 30.

In his maiden speech in Parliament almost 16 years ago, Mr Hartsuyker paid homage to his father's Dutch heritage and how he made a go of life after moving to Australia.

"I am the son of a Dutch migrant who came to this country alone at the age of 17 in 1951 with £25 in his pocket, an old guitar and all his other possessions in a toolbox," he said as part of his speech.



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