Sean Patrick Murphy, 28, pleaded guilty to a string of charges, including manufacturing a weapon using a 3D printer.
Sean Patrick Murphy, 28, pleaded guilty to a string of charges, including manufacturing a weapon using a 3D printer. Amber Hooker

Google, print, brawl: Coast man's 3D-printed weapons

A CRIMINAL on parole was busted with 3D-printed knuckle dusters, a stash of fake licences and various drugs when police found more than they bargained for at his Mudjimba home.

Crown prosecutor Aleksandra Nikolic told the Maroochydore District Court Sean Patrick Murphy, 28, answered the door when police visited his home for an unrelated matter on July 18 last year.

When they spotted drugs, they raided the home and found the 3D-printed weapon which Murphy admitted he had manufactured in January based on instructions he had found on the internet.

Officers also found six MDMA tablets, methamphetamine, drug paraphernalia and a phone which proved Murphy had sold drugs on a number of occasions, which he claimed was to "help out his friends".

Murphy was also found with an ID card printer, 17 different ID cards and a quantity of blank ones, plus and a laptop used to make fake licences for himself and a friend.

When officers hauled Sean Patrick Murphy into the station, he admitted he had created false identification for himself so he could breach parole and leave Queensland to visit his dying father in Western Australia.

 

BIG FIND: Police found two 3D printers, manufactured guns, guns, drugs and other items in the search of a Sunshine Coast home.
BIG FIND: Police found two 3D printers, manufactured guns, guns, drugs and other items in the search of a Sunshine Coast home.

Ms Nikolic said on April 12, Murphy had also sold a 3D printer for $800 to another man on Gumtree, but the buyer claimed he never received it, and Mr Murphy could not provide further details or proof he had sent it.

Following the bust, Murphy was returned to prison to serve out the remainder of a suspended prison sentence for a string of fraud charges for which he received an 18-month suspended jail term in November 2017.

He also served a further 37 days in custody after his full-time release date.

Yesterday, he pleaded guilty to 16 offences which included the manufacture of a weapon when not licensed and eight counts of supplying dangerous drugs; possessing utensils that had been used; possessing dangerous drugs; and possessing equipment for the purpose of facilitating the commission of an offence.

He also pleaded guilty to fraud and dealing with another entity's identification information for the purpose of committing or facilitating the commission of an indictable offence.

Defence lawyer Lily Brisick said Murphy had moved from Western Australia to the Sunshine Coast when he was 12, left school aged 14 to start a chef's apprenticeship, but left with 12 months remaining to become an apprentice carpenter with his father.

Ms Brisick said her client's criminal life started in his late 20s and escalated after his long-term partner suffered a miscarriage and their 10-year relationship broke down.

Ms Brisick said much of Murphy's 10-page criminal history was made up of fraud charges after he left the home he had shared with his partner, and he used false credit cards to pay for accommodation, living and some non-urgent items, some totalling less than $2.

When Murphy learned his father was diagnosed with terminal lung and spine cancer, he made the fake ID to travel to Western Australia and did not ask for permission.

Murphy's father died in June, the bulk of his offences happened in July and he has spent 12 out of the past 20 months in prison.

Judge Glen Cash said he would save the community the "considerable expense" of keeping Murphy in jail, and "take a chance (he) wouldn't ordinarily be inclined to take".

He sentenced him to three years' probation with an extra condition he undertake testing for the presence of dangerous drugs.

He ordered a head sentence of 18-months' jail, wholly suspended for three years and recorded convictions on all charges.



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