SOCIAL MEDIA IMAGE DISCUSS USE WITH YOUR EDITOR - Reg Eggers, 72, (pictured) was attacked by a goanna while trying to rescue his dog last week
SOCIAL MEDIA IMAGE DISCUSS USE WITH YOUR EDITOR - Reg Eggers, 72, (pictured) was attacked by a goanna while trying to rescue his dog last week Facebook

Goanna bite victim still in hospital

A MAN, who was badly injured in a goanna attack after he tried to break up a fight between the reptile and his dog in Flametree, still remains in hospital a week after the attack.

Reg Eggers, 72, and his wife Julie, 64, were injured when they tried to rescue their Jack Russell terrier, which was attacked by the goanna while they were walking on Namanula Drive about 3.30pm on August 15.

RACQ CQ Rescue said Mr Eggers suffered a serious laceration and possible fracture of his right forearm as well as severe bleeding from his leg wound in the attack.

He had to be flown to Mackay Base Hospital by RACQ CQ Rescue helicopter on the day of the attack.

On Tuesday Mr Eggers was taken to Proserpine Hospital by ambulance, where yesterday he remained in a stable condition.

Mrs Eggers was also savagely bitten on the leg and had to be taken by ambulance to Proserpine Hospital for treatment.

She was released from hospital on Saturday morning.

The dog is being treated at a local vet.

Queensland Ambulance Service senior operations supervisor Shane Tucker said Mr Tucker had suffered considerable blood loss when paramedics arrived at the scene.

He said it was believed the man had a cardiac history and was on blood thinners.

"The biggest problem with this nature of bite, being obviously a reptile, there is always the risk of infection," Mr Tucker said. "It's part of this job, there are always the unusual cases you attend.

"I don't believe this gentleman's (injuries) were life-threatening, but due to the nature of the attack... with deep lacerations, with arteries, it certainly could have had the potential for life-threatening injuries.

"But the patient's bleeding was controlled quite quickly in this case."

Reptile expert Lucas Cheyne said the goannas were typically harmless but had a terrifying arsenal.

Mr Cheyne, who has worked with lizards for 30 years and founded Reptile Kingdom Australia, said the injuries suffered by the couple were not surprising.

"It just goes to show what these animals are capable of," he said.

"I expect (the lizard in Flametree) was quite a large specimen, to sustain that much damage."

Mr Cheyne said goannas were not typically aggressive, but would lash out if cornered or attacked.

"Its last resort is to attack, and they are capable of delivering a really nasty bite, flicking injuries with that tail or using their razor sharp claws," he said.



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