Dying cat's life saved by a quick shot of vodka

A SHOT of vodka has saved Tipsy's life.

Found outside an old tyre shop in Lowood, about 70km west of Brisbane, the moggy was brought to the RSPCA in a convulsive and hypothermic state about a week ago.

Seeing acute renal failure, vet Sarah Kanther had to think quickly. An ultrasound soon revealed damage to the one-year-old's kidneys, which Dr Kanther realised, was probably from ingesting antifreeze.

But the good news was there's a cure: hard liquor.

One of the vet's nurses had been given a 375ml bottle of Absolut Vodka for Christmas, which was still in the fridge as an emergency drink to have after a bad day. That day had come.

The moggy was administered Absolut Vodka intravenously.
The moggy was administered Absolut Vodka intravenously. AP Photo - Scanpix

"We basically administered vodka intravenously," Dr Kanther said.

"It sounds a bit radical but the enzymes that metabolise the antifreeze, making it more toxic to the kidneys, also metabolises the ethanol in vodka.

"Once we administered that, he metabolised the vodka instead of the antifreeze."

Tipsy was given about 20ml of vodka through the cephalic vein over 12 hours.

"He was pretty well drunk for a good portion of the day," Dr Kanther said.

After looking woozy throughout the day, Tipsy made a "remarkable recovery". He had the munchies the next morning.

"He's still very young, which I think has helped his recovery," Dr Kanther said.

With no microchip, Tipsy has been given to a foster home for a couple of weeks until he can return to have his kidneys retested. He will then be desexed for a new home.

News Corp Australia


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