Bowraville murders: push to change double jeopardy laws

DOUBLE jeopardy laws in New South Wales will be reviewed in an effort to allow the retrial of a suspect found not guilty of murdering three Aboriginal children in Bowraville almost 25 years ago.

A chain of investigations and court trials has never convicted the killer of Evelyn Greenup, 4, Colleen Walker-Craig, 16, and Clinton Speedy-Duroux, 16, over five months in 1990 and 1991.

The three children disappeared from the same stretch of road.

A man was tried for two of the murders and suspected of Colleen's, whose body remains missing, but he was never convicted.

NSW Attorney-General Gabrielle Upton this week appointed Justice James Woods to oversee a review of the state's double jeopardy laws, following an upper house inquiry that found flaws in the trial system.

The inquiry heard the legal system at the time prevented the man being tried for all the murders in the single trial, meaning crucial evidence may have been missed.

If successful, the review will allow the case and others like it to be retried a single time.

Greens MP David Shoebridge, who moved the motion to establish the parliamentary inquiry, said the children's families were a step closer to finally receiving justice.

"We still intend to move on the Greens' double jeopardy bill."

Justice Wood's final report is due on November 15.



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