DAVID Warner has told students at his old school how he sought professional help to manage his mental health in the wake of the ­cricket cheating crisis - and encouraged them not to be afraid to do the same.

The disgraced vice-captain's first Test and one-day shirts hang proudly in the hallways at Randwick Boys High School and he is still close with some of his old teachers, such as Tess Cassar, who was the school's under-14s cricket coach.

This week Warner returned to cricket in Canada, with a game for the Winnipeg Hawks. But, before he left, he returned to his old school as part of Men's Health Week.

 

Cricketer David Warner went back to his old school, Randwick Boys' High School, to give them some advice on life. Picture: Supplied
Cricketer David Warner went back to his old school, Randwick Boys' High School, to give them some advice on life. Picture: Supplied

 

Principal Lance Raskall said the visit was kept private from the media and there was a prospect the star batsman will return later in the year to coach junior teams.

He said Warner's honesty had ­impressed the students, even in the face of questions about his morals after what happened in Cape Town.

"David acknowledged it was a tough time in his life. He's got through it with family and friends but also by seeking professional ass­istance. And, as a man, he's not afraid to do so," Mr Raskall said.

"Talking to your friends is great, but they're not ­experts. There are professionals out there who can offer assistance.

"His message was that whatever happens in life you've got your family, your friends and experts who can help you. He spoke in a very humble way and there was genuine remorse for what he'd done. We did it as part of Men's Health Week … the student feedback was superb.

He talked about the passion for life and he was very open and very honest with what he had to say.

"A lot of the boys came away and thought: 'You know, if ever I experience something like that, I know that there are professionals out there that I can turn to'."

Mr Raskall said Warner's humble beginnings at Matraville also struck a chord with students.

"A lot of them are from non-­English speaking backgrounds. And those families have moved to this country to provide a better chance at life, a better education and more ­opportunities," he said.

Warner was reflective when he spoke to reporters in Canada.

"I have time to think over the next nine months what my future holds," he said. "These 12 months are going to be a good (chance) to reflect on myself as a person, as a dad and a family man."



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