THE BEGINNING: The first  Dalby Herald  office in Dalby. The town's early newspapers would have been prepared and printed in this building.
THE BEGINNING: The first Dalby Herald office in Dalby. The town's early newspapers would have been prepared and printed in this building. Contributed

Dalby's early storytellers had many stories of their own

STORIES of early Dalby were remembered by the old-timers. Many were sometimes witnessed by the teller and others were part of the hearsay.

On the spot to record the action was often the reporter of the Dalby Herald.

When Henry Pegg returned to Dalby, he related a few stories about the town when he was on the staff in 1890-91.

A flood occurred while he was in Dalby and water rose around the Queens Arms Hotel, where he and the other printer were sleeping.

Most of the other people had left the building and began calling out to them.

Henry awoke and put his hand over the side of the bed and realised the water was already in their room.

He quickly awoke the other chap and they dressed standing on their beds. Being young, they looked upon it as a joke.

A poplar constable in town, who had been through a tragic event, was standing under the awning of the butcher shop talking with several lads when a spider fell from the roof and landed on his neck.

It must have bitten him as he received such a fright he believed it was a snake bite.

He panicked and threw his tunic in the street and proceeded to nearly go out of his mind.

Scared at his behaviour, the lads bolted and even Henry and his mate shut themselves in their room until the constable recovered.

After a time they thought they had better search for him and offer their assistance, if needed.

They found him sitting in Drayton St, staring at his watch that had been completely smashed.

He still declared he had been bitten by a snake and admitted it had really frightened him.

He begged them to all have a drink at his expense and not mention the incident to their friends.

They kept the bargain as the officer was held in high esteem throughout the town.

Old Mr Haly was the Police Magistrate at that time and was a man beloved by everyone who knew him. One day he went around to the Herald office and asked the editor, Mr McDougall, and reporter Henry Pegg to drive out with him to see his little racehorse Breeza II, gallop. They climbed aboard the magistrate's buggy, drove out to the racecourse and witnessed the gallop.

While there, night began to close in and they decided to go home. It was getting dark and the editor felt the old magistrate might not see too well in the gloom and suggested he take the reins.

Haly consented but five minutes later an unseen stump caught the axle of the buggy and the horse broke free and galloped off into the night.

The three passengers were left sitting in the cold a fair way out town.

Old Mr Haly didn't seem too put out as he remarked” "Never mind boys. there are worse accidents at sea”.

The editor walked into Dalby while the others collected wood and built a fire as the magistrate suffered from rheumatism.

Eventually Mr McDougall arrived back with another horse and, once it was connected to the buggy, they were soon back in Dalby with nobody much the worse for their ordeal.



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