John Lloyd is demanding answers and a change in policy after his son, George, was accidentally given another child's medication at Chancellor State College last week. Photo: Patrick Woods
John Lloyd is demanding answers and a change in policy after his son, George, was accidentally given another child's medication at Chancellor State College last week. Photo: Patrick Woods

'How could this happen?': Medicine bungle sparks alarm

JOHN Lloyd is demanding a change in state school procedures after his son was given the wrong medication at Chancellor State College last week.

The seven-year-old Year 2 student was on a case of liquid antibiotics for a mild skin condition, which needed to be administered every four hours.

But on Wednesday, George was accidentally given another child's Ritalin medication instead of his own.

Mr Lloyd said while his son was luckily fine, the incident could have been fatal.

"There's allergic reactions to medications that are fatal," he said.

"I was shocked. I was obviously concerned for my son … but I was just as shocked that this could happen."

George Lloyd, 7, was given Ritalin, a medication for ADHD, instead of his prescribed antibiotics. Photo: Patrick Woods
George Lloyd, 7, was given Ritalin, a medication for ADHD, instead of his prescribed antibiotics. Photo: Patrick Woods

Mr Lloyd said he and his wife, Kellie, were alerted straight away but neither could get back to the school immediately.

He said the doctor who prescribed George the medication told the school to monitor him until the parents arrived.

"Before we got a chance to get back to the school he was sent back to class," Mr Lloyd said.

"How was that teacher supposed to successfully monitor his condition with a class full of 25 other kids?"

Mr Lloyd said he felt the school had "failed in their duty of care for my child" and has requested an investigation and change in procedures for administering medication.

"I want to see a change in policy and procedure that reflects what the rest of the medical world do. You've got to double check," he said.

"There's fundamental flaws in the policies and procedures here, and they need to change.

"I'd hate to read in five years' time that a child somewhere in Queensland died as a result … of being given the incorrect medication in a school."

Chancellor State College is investigating after Year 2 student George Lloyd was given another child’s medication. Photo: Patrick Woods
Chancellor State College is investigating after Year 2 student George Lloyd was given another child’s medication. Photo: Patrick Woods

Mr Lloyd said he was unhappy with the response he'd had from the school after the incident, and felt it was "hiding behind" the policies in place, which he said did not outline double checking the child's name on the prescription.

"When they do something wrong, they've got to own it," he said. "They're hiding behind their processes."

An Education Queensland spokesman said Chancellor State College was reviewing the incident and would "revisit" its internal processes and record keeping associated with administering medication.

"The safety and wellbeing of students is paramount in all Queensland state schools," the spokesman said.

"Chancellor State College is reviewing a recent incident in which a student received incorrect medication."



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