THE High Court ruling last week that the NSW Government's controversial consorting laws are valid, came as great timing for Coffs Clarence police.

Challenged legally by two Nomads members, the legislation introduced in 2012, followed a wave of gun violence in Sydney.

Under the laws, any person who habitually consorts with offenders convicted of a serious offence, after an official warning, is guilty of an offence and can face three years in jail or a $16,500 fine.

Armed with these powers, police are set to boost their ranks on the Coffs Coast from next weekend.

"These known criminals who think they can come into this area to party and ignore the safety of the community, should know we will target them very strongly, they will be booked for consorting and we will see them in court and behind bars," Coffs Clarence Crime Manager Detective Inspector Darren Jameson said.



REVEALED: Coffs Harbour's Most Influential list

premium_icon REVEALED: Coffs Harbour's Most Influential list

The final instalment of our 12-part series.

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premium_icon Coffs Harbour's Most Influential - Part 11

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