Buzzers, drones and thermal imaging fight wild dogs

SENSOR-activated buzzers, military grade drones and thermal imaging technology may sound like props for a movie but these new technologies are being used to help reduce wild dog numbers across the Southern Downs.

Council pest management officer Craig Magnussen said the council used a range of strategies to reduce the impact of wild dogs on farming land and stock and on the local natural environment.

"Wild dogs are a costly burden on local communities, reducing income for landholders which means less money, people and services in our region. They are also carriers of diseases which can affect humans," Mr Magnussen said.

"Recently a private company approached SDRC with regard to testing sophisticated, military grade drones and thermal imaging technology to detect feral animals.

"The technology has the potential to locate wild dog and other feral animal habitat in even the most inaccessible country. This is very exciting in terms of being able to have a much more targeted and efficient approach with conventional control methods.

"Council is still in discussions about this new initiative and will research the idea in the new year."

Mr Magnussen said it was not the only strategy council had implemented recently.

"Another new strategy recently implemented is grid buzzers. A couple of landholders involved with the Traprock Wool Group raised the idea of sensor activated buzzers - these are in use further west on grids in the dingo barrier fence and increasingly being adopted by other organisations," he said.



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